2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161544
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Biopsychosocial effects of the bootstrap intervention in Navy recruits
Abstract:
Biopsychosocial effects of the bootstrap intervention in Navy recruits
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Williams, Reg
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.4927
Recruit training is a controlled situation in which young men and women are subjected to stress through separation from social supports and intense emotional and intellectual challenges. Using Stuart's response to stress model, the purpose of this prospective study was to investigate effects of a cognitive-behavioral intervention called Boot Camp Survival Training for Navy Recruits-A Prescription (BOOTSTRAP) on stress,depression, HPA functioning (salivary cortisols), interpersonal factors, and recruit training performance outcomes. Data were collected on 817 recruits. There were significant differences in the "at-risk" recruits from control recruits with greater depressive symptoms and stress levels. Recruits who received the Intervention significantly increased their sense of belonging, experienced less loneliness, increased their problem-solving coping and decreased insecure attachment. Cortisol levels revealed distinct patterns in the non-intervention group as compared with the control and intervention groups. Those recruits successfully completing training were 84% for the controls, 86% for the intervention group, and only 74% for the non-intervention group. Refining a model for depression, testing of an intervention that reduces depressive symptoms and interpersonal difficulties, which impacts training performance and helps with reducing attrition, have important implications for the Navy as well as for young men and women with depressive symptoms provided by nursing research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBiopsychosocial effects of the bootstrap intervention in Navy recruitsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161544-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Biopsychosocial effects of the bootstrap intervention in Navy recruits</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Williams, Reg</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.4927</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rawill@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recruit training is a controlled situation in which young men and women are subjected to stress through separation from social supports and intense emotional and intellectual challenges. Using Stuart's response to stress model, the purpose of this prospective study was to investigate effects of a cognitive-behavioral intervention called Boot Camp Survival Training for Navy Recruits-A Prescription (BOOTSTRAP) on stress,depression, HPA functioning (salivary cortisols), interpersonal factors, and recruit training performance outcomes. Data were collected on 817 recruits. There were significant differences in the &quot;at-risk&quot; recruits from control recruits with greater depressive symptoms and stress levels. Recruits who received the Intervention significantly increased their sense of belonging, experienced less loneliness, increased their problem-solving coping and decreased insecure attachment. Cortisol levels revealed distinct patterns in the non-intervention group as compared with the control and intervention groups. Those recruits successfully completing training were 84% for the controls, 86% for the intervention group, and only 74% for the non-intervention group. Refining a model for depression, testing of an intervention that reduces depressive symptoms and interpersonal difficulties, which impacts training performance and helps with reducing attrition, have important implications for the Navy as well as for young men and women with depressive symptoms provided by nursing research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:06Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.