Psychometrics of the depressive cognition scale in African American female caregivers and noncaregivers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161546
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Psychometrics of the depressive cognition scale in African American female caregivers and noncaregivers
Abstract:
Psychometrics of the depressive cognition scale in African American female caregivers and noncaregivers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.3612
Although depression strikes women twice as often as men and favors no single ethnic group, in African American (AA) women, it frequently goes unnoticed and untreated. Research shows that AA women commonly experience cognitive symptoms that antecede clinical depression as Beck's Cognitive Theory of Depression suggests. Yet, depression scales lack adequate psychometric testing in AA women and do not address contextual factors and role integration that affect depression. This psychometric analysis of the 8-item Depressive Cognition Scale (DCS) was conducted in a probability sample of 246 AA women, including 102 caregivers (CG) and 144 noncaregivers (NCG), who were subjects of a larger NINR-funded study. Alpha coefficients for the three groups (.82, .75, and .85, respectively) showed internal consistency. Correlations in the expected directions (p < .01) with resourcefulness, depression, and daily hassles scales demonstrated construct validity (r's=.37, -.40, and -.30, respectively). Factor analyses revealed a single dimension for NCGs and two dimensions for CGs that reflected Beck's autonomy and sociotropy subtypes of depressive cognition. The findings indicate that the DCS is a reliable and valid measure for AA women and suggest that the context and role integration involved in caregiving may reflect the sociotropy dimension of depressive cognition.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePsychometrics of the depressive cognition scale in African American female caregivers and noncaregiversen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161546-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Psychometrics of the depressive cognition scale in African American female caregivers and noncaregivers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Zauszniewski, Jaclene, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.3612</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jaz@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although depression strikes women twice as often as men and favors no single ethnic group, in African American (AA) women, it frequently goes unnoticed and untreated. Research shows that AA women commonly experience cognitive symptoms that antecede clinical depression as Beck's Cognitive Theory of Depression suggests. Yet, depression scales lack adequate psychometric testing in AA women and do not address contextual factors and role integration that affect depression. This psychometric analysis of the 8-item Depressive Cognition Scale (DCS) was conducted in a probability sample of 246 AA women, including 102 caregivers (CG) and 144 noncaregivers (NCG), who were subjects of a larger NINR-funded study. Alpha coefficients for the three groups (.82, .75, and .85, respectively) showed internal consistency. Correlations in the expected directions (p &lt; .01) with resourcefulness, depression, and daily hassles scales demonstrated construct validity (r's=.37, -.40, and -.30, respectively). Factor analyses revealed a single dimension for NCGs and two dimensions for CGs that reflected Beck's autonomy and sociotropy subtypes of depressive cognition. The findings indicate that the DCS is a reliable and valid measure for AA women and suggest that the context and role integration involved in caregiving may reflect the sociotropy dimension of depressive cognition.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:08Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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