2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161549
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Determinants of Healthy Eating among Midlife and Older Rural Women
Abstract:
Determinants of Healthy Eating among Midlife and Older Rural Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Walker, Susan, EdD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Professor & Department Chair
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402.559.6561
Purpose: Poor diet is one of the top ten causes of morbidity and premature mortality among older women. The study purpose was to determine the extent to which cognitive/perceptual (CP) variables (perceived self-efficacy, perceived benefits and perceived barriers to healthy eating) and stage of readiness for change in dietary intake (SOC) explain healthy eating behavior among midlife and older rural women as reflected in adherence to the U.S. Food Guide Pyramid recommendations for daily servings of food groups (grains, vegetables, fruits, dairy, meat). Conceptual Framework: Determinants of healthy eating were selected from the Transtheoretical Model of health behavior change (Prochaska & Di Clemente, 1982). Methods: The convenience sample of 298 women aged 40 to 83 (X=62.6 +9.75 years) from rural areas across the U.S. completed a packet of reliable and valid instruments during a national meeting of a family and community education organization. Measures included the Healthy Eating Benefits/Barriers Scales, Healthy Eating Self-Efficacy Scale, Stage of Eating Adherence Questionnaire and healthy eating items extracted from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. Results and Conclusions: Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that CP variables explained 13% of variance in total pyramid adherence and from 2% to 8% of variance in specific food groups adherence; SOC explained 6% of variance in total pyramid adherence and from 0% to 10% of variance in specific food groups adherence. Variables that made an independent contribution to the explanation of one or more indicators of healthy eating were self-efficacy (?s from .14 to .22) and stage of change (?s from .13 to .33). Perceived benefits and barriers made no independent contribution to the explanation of any healthy eating behavior. Identification of factors that influence healthy eating may provide a basis for designing dietary change interventions for this vulnerable and under-studied population of rural women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDeterminants of Healthy Eating among Midlife and Older Rural Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161549-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Determinants of Healthy Eating among Midlife and Older Rural Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Walker, Susan, EdD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor &amp; Department Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402.559.6561</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">swalker@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Poor diet is one of the top ten causes of morbidity and premature mortality among older women. The study purpose was to determine the extent to which cognitive/perceptual (CP) variables (perceived self-efficacy, perceived benefits and perceived barriers to healthy eating) and stage of readiness for change in dietary intake (SOC) explain healthy eating behavior among midlife and older rural women as reflected in adherence to the U.S. Food Guide Pyramid recommendations for daily servings of food groups (grains, vegetables, fruits, dairy, meat). Conceptual Framework: Determinants of healthy eating were selected from the Transtheoretical Model of health behavior change (Prochaska &amp; Di Clemente, 1982). Methods: The convenience sample of 298 women aged 40 to 83 (X=62.6 +9.75 years) from rural areas across the U.S. completed a packet of reliable and valid instruments during a national meeting of a family and community education organization. Measures included the Healthy Eating Benefits/Barriers Scales, Healthy Eating Self-Efficacy Scale, Stage of Eating Adherence Questionnaire and healthy eating items extracted from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey. Results and Conclusions: Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that CP variables explained 13% of variance in total pyramid adherence and from 2% to 8% of variance in specific food groups adherence; SOC explained 6% of variance in total pyramid adherence and from 0% to 10% of variance in specific food groups adherence. Variables that made an independent contribution to the explanation of one or more indicators of healthy eating were self-efficacy (?s from .14 to .22) and stage of change (?s from .13 to .33). Perceived benefits and barriers made no independent contribution to the explanation of any healthy eating behavior. Identification of factors that influence healthy eating may provide a basis for designing dietary change interventions for this vulnerable and under-studied population of rural women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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