2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161553
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Presence Practices of Critical Care and Emergency Nurses
Abstract:
Family Presence Practices of Critical Care and Emergency Nurses
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:MacLean, Susan
P.I. Institution Name:Emergency Nurses Association
Title:Group Director
Contact Address:915 Lee Street, Des Plaines, IL, 60016-6569, USA
Contact Telephone:800.900.9659
Purpose: Allowing family members at the bedside during invasive procedures (IP) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a relatively new practice. A holistic health care perspective identifies the importance of family as the patient's primary support system, however, little is known about family presence practices in emergency and critical care units. The purpose of this study was to determine: the prevalence of written and unwritten family presence policies, nurses' policy preferences, how often families ask to be present, and the extent to which emergency and critical care nurses bring family members to the bedside during CPR and IP. Methods: The investigators developed and pilot-tested a 30-question survey. A random sample of 3000 emergency and critical care nurses received surveys in October 2000 and 984 surveys were returned. Data were analyzed using descriptive, Chi Square, Mann Whitney U, and logistic regression statistics. Results: Very few nurses (5%) practiced on units with written policies, however, 45% allowed the option but had no written guidelines. Caring for pediatric patients, working in an ED, and working in certain regions were significantly associated with supporting family presence. Only 1% of the units had written policies prohibiting the option, however, 25% prohibited family presence without written policies. About 40% of the nurses preferred the option of family presence either by written or unwritten guidelines. The nurses also indicated that they had taken family members to the bedside during both CPR (35%) and IP (43%), and that families frequently asked to go to the bedside during CPR (30%) and IP (60%). Conclusions: The results indicated a split in the nurses' willingness to embrace family presence. Patient care units will need to decide where they stand on family presence. Written policies or guidelines are recommended in order to provide consistent, safe, and caring practices for families, patients, and staff.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Presence Practices of Critical Care and Emergency Nursesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161553-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Family Presence Practices of Critical Care and Emergency Nurses</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">MacLean, Susan</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Emergency Nurses Association</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Group Director</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">915 Lee Street, Des Plaines, IL, 60016-6569, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">800.900.9659</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">smaclean@ena.org</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Allowing family members at the bedside during invasive procedures (IP) and cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is a relatively new practice. A holistic health care perspective identifies the importance of family as the patient's primary support system, however, little is known about family presence practices in emergency and critical care units. The purpose of this study was to determine: the prevalence of written and unwritten family presence policies, nurses' policy preferences, how often families ask to be present, and the extent to which emergency and critical care nurses bring family members to the bedside during CPR and IP. Methods: The investigators developed and pilot-tested a 30-question survey. A random sample of 3000 emergency and critical care nurses received surveys in October 2000 and 984 surveys were returned. Data were analyzed using descriptive, Chi Square, Mann Whitney U, and logistic regression statistics. Results: Very few nurses (5%) practiced on units with written policies, however, 45% allowed the option but had no written guidelines. Caring for pediatric patients, working in an ED, and working in certain regions were significantly associated with supporting family presence. Only 1% of the units had written policies prohibiting the option, however, 25% prohibited family presence without written policies. About 40% of the nurses preferred the option of family presence either by written or unwritten guidelines. The nurses also indicated that they had taken family members to the bedside during both CPR (35%) and IP (43%), and that families frequently asked to go to the bedside during CPR (30%) and IP (60%). Conclusions: The results indicated a split in the nurses' willingness to embrace family presence. Patient care units will need to decide where they stand on family presence. Written policies or guidelines are recommended in order to provide consistent, safe, and caring practices for families, patients, and staff.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:15Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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