2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161554
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Pre-Hospital Delay in Seeking Treatment after Ami in Korean Population
Abstract:
Pre-Hospital Delay in Seeking Treatment after Ami in Korean Population
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:An, Kyungeh
P.I. Institution Name:Ewha Women's University
Title:Full-Time Lecturer
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Seoul, 120-750, Korea
Purpose: to investigate the delay time in seeking treatment after and factors associated with the delay. Background: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a major cause of death in Korea. Delay in seeking treatment may cause unnecessary exacerbation of the disease and contribute early mortality from this disease. It is important to identify how long and why the patients delay in seeking treatment after their symptoms appear and the factors that associated with this delay inI patients. There is a lack of data in the Korean population regarding delay time in treatment after and many health care providers are concerned about this delay and the high mortality ofI. Sample & Method: 64I patients were interviewed and their medical records were reviewed. Results: The overall pre-hospital delay time was 17.42°3/424.03 hours. Most of the pre-hospital delay consisted of patients°¯ delay (17.07°3/424.45 hours). Delay time from the symptom onset to call 119 was 13.79°3/423.30 hours. In the group that did not call 119, delay time from symptom onset to departure to the hospital was 17.03°3/424.45 hours. Transportation delay was 33.88°3/4.23.74 (minutes) via emergency vehicle and 30.98°3/421.57 for whom didn't call 119. Marital status was significantly associated with the overall pre-hospital delay time (F=9.721, p=.000) as well as with the delay time from symptom onset to calling 119 (F=13.065, p=.001). Overall pre-hospital delay was less in single group than in married or divorced group (7.44°3/47.82, vs. 19.13°3/429.14 and 144.42, respectively). Married people delayed less than a divorced person (12.92°3/423.94 vs. 144.08 hours) until they called 119 from their symptom onset. Conclusion: The mean length of delay appeared longer than those in previous studies. However, the number of people who came to the hospital within the time window for the optimal thrombolytic therapy increased (41.9%).
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePre-Hospital Delay in Seeking Treatment after Ami in Korean Populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161554-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Pre-Hospital Delay in Seeking Treatment after Ami in Korean Population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">An, Kyungeh</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Ewha Women's University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Full-Time Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Seoul, 120-750, Korea</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: to investigate the delay time in seeking treatment after and factors associated with the delay. Background: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a major cause of death in Korea. Delay in seeking treatment may cause unnecessary exacerbation of the disease and contribute early mortality from this disease. It is important to identify how long and why the patients delay in seeking treatment after their symptoms appear and the factors that associated with this delay inI patients. There is a lack of data in the Korean population regarding delay time in treatment after and many health care providers are concerned about this delay and the high mortality ofI. Sample &amp; Method: 64I patients were interviewed and their medical records were reviewed. Results: The overall pre-hospital delay time was 17.42&deg;3/424.03 hours. Most of the pre-hospital delay consisted of patients&deg;&macr; delay (17.07&deg;3/424.45 hours). Delay time from the symptom onset to call 119 was 13.79&deg;3/423.30 hours. In the group that did not call 119, delay time from symptom onset to departure to the hospital was 17.03&deg;3/424.45 hours. Transportation delay was 33.88&deg;3/4.23.74 (minutes) via emergency vehicle and 30.98&deg;3/421.57 for whom didn't call 119. Marital status was significantly associated with the overall pre-hospital delay time (F=9.721, p=.000) as well as with the delay time from symptom onset to calling 119 (F=13.065, p=.001). Overall pre-hospital delay was less in single group than in married or divorced group (7.44&deg;3/47.82, vs. 19.13&deg;3/429.14 and 144.42, respectively). Married people delayed less than a divorced person (12.92&deg;3/423.94 vs. 144.08 hours) until they called 119 from their symptom onset. Conclusion: The mean length of delay appeared longer than those in previous studies. However, the number of people who came to the hospital within the time window for the optimal thrombolytic therapy increased (41.9%).</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:16Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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