Exercise Self-Efficacy and Stage of Change Behavior among Older Adults toward a Home Strength Training Program

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161556
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exercise Self-Efficacy and Stage of Change Behavior among Older Adults toward a Home Strength Training Program
Abstract:
Exercise Self-Efficacy and Stage of Change Behavior among Older Adults toward a Home Strength Training Program
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Bawel, Karen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Southern Indiana
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing and Health Professions, 8600 University Boulevard, Evansville, IN, 47712-3596, USA
Contact Telephone:812.465.5212
Regular exercise is a contributor to the well being of older adults. Unfortunately, 70+% of older adults do not participate in a regular exercise behavior. Self-efficacy and stage of change behavior (SOCB) have been suggested as determinates of exercise behavior in adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1986, 1997) and SOCB (Prochaska & DiClemente, 1983, 1996) to the initiation of an in-home strength training exercise program. Propositions were that persons with high self-efficacy and/or in an action mode of SOCB would try the exercises when compared with those in preaction stages and/or low self-efficacy. The sample included healthy, community-dwelling older adults (N=91) 65 or older (M=73.8 years). SOCB and self-efficacy were assessed at the initial meeting and at six and twelve weeks. SOCB was determined by the participant's "highest degree" of agreement on one of six items on the SOCB questionnaire consisting of six items and using a 5-point Likert scale. The Strength Self-Efficacy Questionnaire consisted of 42 items with 10-point semantic scales. Both instruments have demonstrated reliability and validity. A significantly higher percentage of participants in the "action" stages tried the exercises compared with those in a pre-action group (determined by X2). Participants who tried the strength training exercises had significantly higher total and strength self-efficacy scores than those who did not (determined by independent t-tests). The findings suggest that self-efficacy and stage of change behavior may be contributors to older adults' decisions to initiate strength training exercises in a home strength training program. Further research will include a planned intervention incorporating a supervised home exercise program to assess whether actual experience with the exercises impacts the contribution of self-efficacy and SOCB to participation in the exercise program.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExercise Self-Efficacy and Stage of Change Behavior among Older Adults toward a Home Strength Training Programen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161556-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exercise Self-Efficacy and Stage of Change Behavior among Older Adults toward a Home Strength Training Program</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bawel, Karen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Southern Indiana</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing and Health Professions, 8600 University Boulevard, Evansville, IN, 47712-3596, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">812.465.5212</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kbawel@usi.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Regular exercise is a contributor to the well being of older adults. Unfortunately, 70+% of older adults do not participate in a regular exercise behavior. Self-efficacy and stage of change behavior (SOCB) have been suggested as determinates of exercise behavior in adults. The purpose of this study was to examine the contribution of self-efficacy (Bandura, 1986, 1997) and SOCB (Prochaska &amp; DiClemente, 1983, 1996) to the initiation of an in-home strength training exercise program. Propositions were that persons with high self-efficacy and/or in an action mode of SOCB would try the exercises when compared with those in preaction stages and/or low self-efficacy. The sample included healthy, community-dwelling older adults (N=91) 65 or older (M=73.8 years). SOCB and self-efficacy were assessed at the initial meeting and at six and twelve weeks. SOCB was determined by the participant's &quot;highest degree&quot; of agreement on one of six items on the SOCB questionnaire consisting of six items and using a 5-point Likert scale. The Strength Self-Efficacy Questionnaire consisted of 42 items with 10-point semantic scales. Both instruments have demonstrated reliability and validity. A significantly higher percentage of participants in the &quot;action&quot; stages tried the exercises compared with those in a pre-action group (determined by X2). Participants who tried the strength training exercises had significantly higher total and strength self-efficacy scores than those who did not (determined by independent t-tests). The findings suggest that self-efficacy and stage of change behavior may be contributors to older adults' decisions to initiate strength training exercises in a home strength training program. Further research will include a planned intervention incorporating a supervised home exercise program to assess whether actual experience with the exercises impacts the contribution of self-efficacy and SOCB to participation in the exercise program.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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