Comparison of Brain Temperature and Pulmonary Artery Temperature among Individuals with Cranial Pathology

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161561
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Brain Temperature and Pulmonary Artery Temperature among Individuals with Cranial Pathology
Abstract:
Comparison of Brain Temperature and Pulmonary Artery Temperature among Individuals with Cranial Pathology
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:McCurren, Cynthia, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Louisville
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 555 South Floyd Street, Room 3019, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA
Contact Telephone:502.852.5366
Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study is to examine the relationship between brain and core body temperatures in febrile and afebrile states among individuals with cranial pathology. Theoretical Framework: The injured brain is sensitive to variations in temperature with evidence suggesting that hyperthermia exacerbates neuronal injury and increases oxygen consumption. Brain temperature is generally assumed to be similar to core body temperature, but there is emerging evidence that brain temperature may be higher. Sample/Method: Patients (> 14 years of age) requiring intracranial pressure monitoring catheter (equipped with thermistor) and pulmonary artery catheter (gold standard for core body temperature) have temperature values recorded via Hewlett-Packard bedside monitors as part of routine care. The values are being retrieved from patient records and the relationships between the brain and core temperatures in febrile (>100.4° per pulmonary artery) and afebrile states are being examined. The influence of gender, age, ICP and CCP on brain and core temperature is also being investigated. The anticipated number of subjects is 25. Results: Preliminary results on the first 19 subjects, constituting 1,976 data points are available. For febrile states (n=788) and afebrile states (n=1188), there are clinically and statistically significant differences between the core and brain temperatures (e.g., for afebrile, the mean body temperature is 99.4° and mean brain temperature 100.3°). Conclusions: In using core temperature to guide interventions for patients with cranial pathology, clinicians may be undertreating hyperthermic states. The final results of this study may potentially influence practice among critical care patients with cranial pathology.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Brain Temperature and Pulmonary Artery Temperature among Individuals with Cranial Pathologyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161561-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Comparison of Brain Temperature and Pulmonary Artery Temperature among Individuals with Cranial Pathology</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCurren, Cynthia, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Louisville</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 555 South Floyd Street, Room 3019, Louisville, KY, 40292, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">502.852.5366</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">camccu01@louisville.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: The purpose of this descriptive study is to examine the relationship between brain and core body temperatures in febrile and afebrile states among individuals with cranial pathology. Theoretical Framework: The injured brain is sensitive to variations in temperature with evidence suggesting that hyperthermia exacerbates neuronal injury and increases oxygen consumption. Brain temperature is generally assumed to be similar to core body temperature, but there is emerging evidence that brain temperature may be higher. Sample/Method: Patients (&gt; 14 years of age) requiring intracranial pressure monitoring catheter (equipped with thermistor) and pulmonary artery catheter (gold standard for core body temperature) have temperature values recorded via Hewlett-Packard bedside monitors as part of routine care. The values are being retrieved from patient records and the relationships between the brain and core temperatures in febrile (&gt;100.4&deg; per pulmonary artery) and afebrile states are being examined. The influence of gender, age, ICP and CCP on brain and core temperature is also being investigated. The anticipated number of subjects is 25. Results: Preliminary results on the first 19 subjects, constituting 1,976 data points are available. For febrile states (n=788) and afebrile states (n=1188), there are clinically and statistically significant differences between the core and brain temperatures (e.g., for afebrile, the mean body temperature is 99.4&deg; and mean brain temperature 100.3&deg;). Conclusions: In using core temperature to guide interventions for patients with cranial pathology, clinicians may be undertreating hyperthermic states. The final results of this study may potentially influence practice among critical care patients with cranial pathology.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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