2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161564
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Impact of Mental Illness on Pre Pregnancy Weight (Bmi)
Abstract:
Impact of Mental Illness on Pre Pregnancy Weight (Bmi)
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Flick, Louise
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
Contact Telephone:314.577.8992
Studies of single psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression show a marked impact on infant birth weight. Potential mechanisms include the impact of illness on health behavior including nutrition and the physiological effects of maternal stress on the fetus. Research has revealed that mental illness, alcohol and tobacco use, and life stresses can affect body weight and eating behavior. This atheoretical study examines whether pregnant women with a psychiatric disorder are more likely to have inappropriate pre pregnancy weight (BMI) than women without a psychiatric disorder. Using data from an on-going longitudinal study of psychiatric illness in pregnancy, supported by NIMH, data on 143 pregnant Medicaid-eligible women recruited from the WIC Supplemental Nutrition Program were analyzed. The sample is stratified by race and urban/rural residence and is representative of low-income residents from Missouri Bootheel and the City of St. Louis. A lay administered standardized psychiatric interview (DIS-IV) determined lifetime and current diagnosis of 13 disorders. The results show 54% of the sample has a lifetime psychiatric disorder, 27% a current disorder. A life-events stress questionnaire was administered to obtain a life stress index. Pre pregnancy weight was obtained from WIC intake records. More than half of the sample have inappropriate BMI. The association between pre pregnancy BMI and psychiatric disorder in pregnancy is not significant using multiple regression, and hierarchical multiple regression to test mediating variables of tobacco uses. Pre pregnancy BMI might not be merely correlated to presence or absence of psychiatric disorder in pregnancy, but also to severity and chronicity of the disorders and life stress, and the use of alcohol and other illicit drugs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImpact of Mental Illness on Pre Pregnancy Weight (Bmi)en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161564-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Impact of Mental Illness on Pre Pregnancy Weight (Bmi)</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Flick, Louise</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">314.577.8992</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">flicklh@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Studies of single psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and depression show a marked impact on infant birth weight. Potential mechanisms include the impact of illness on health behavior including nutrition and the physiological effects of maternal stress on the fetus. Research has revealed that mental illness, alcohol and tobacco use, and life stresses can affect body weight and eating behavior. This atheoretical study examines whether pregnant women with a psychiatric disorder are more likely to have inappropriate pre pregnancy weight (BMI) than women without a psychiatric disorder. Using data from an on-going longitudinal study of psychiatric illness in pregnancy, supported by NIMH, data on 143 pregnant Medicaid-eligible women recruited from the WIC Supplemental Nutrition Program were analyzed. The sample is stratified by race and urban/rural residence and is representative of low-income residents from Missouri Bootheel and the City of St. Louis. A lay administered standardized psychiatric interview (DIS-IV) determined lifetime and current diagnosis of 13 disorders. The results show 54% of the sample has a lifetime psychiatric disorder, 27% a current disorder. A life-events stress questionnaire was administered to obtain a life stress index. Pre pregnancy weight was obtained from WIC intake records. More than half of the sample have inappropriate BMI. The association between pre pregnancy BMI and psychiatric disorder in pregnancy is not significant using multiple regression, and hierarchical multiple regression to test mediating variables of tobacco uses. Pre pregnancy BMI might not be merely correlated to presence or absence of psychiatric disorder in pregnancy, but also to severity and chronicity of the disorders and life stress, and the use of alcohol and other illicit drugs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:27Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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