2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161567
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Relaxation and Music Reduce Pain after Gyn Surgery
Abstract:
Relaxation and Music Reduce Pain after Gyn Surgery
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Good, Marion, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.5975
The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effect of three nonpharmacological nursing interventions: relaxation, music, and the combination of relaxation and music on pain following gynecological (GYN) surgery. There have been few studies of these interventions on GYN patients. Based on a proposition from the Good and Moore middle-range theory, 311 patients, age 18-70 in five Midwestern hospitals were randomly assigned using minimization to the three intervention groups or a control group. They were tested during ambulation and rest on postoperative days 1 and 2. Pain was measured with sensation and distress of pain visual analogue scales. Multivariate analysis of covariance of posttest sensation and distress was used with pretest control and apriori contrasts. The intervention groups had significantly less posttest pain than the controls (p=.022 - .001) on the first and second postoperative days. The three interventions were similar in their effect on pain. Patients who received the interventions plus patient controlled analgesia (PCA) had 9% to 27% less pain than controls who used PCA alone. Reduced pain was related to amount of activity (ambulation or rest) and mastery of the use of the intervention; findings were supported by decreased pulse and respiration. Nurses who care for GYN surgical patients can provide soft music and relaxation tapes and instruct patients to use them during postoperative ambulation and also at rest on days 1 and 2.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRelaxation and Music Reduce Pain after Gyn Surgeryen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161567-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Relaxation and Music Reduce Pain after Gyn Surgery</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Good, Marion, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.5975</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mpg@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effect of three nonpharmacological nursing interventions: relaxation, music, and the combination of relaxation and music on pain following gynecological (GYN) surgery. There have been few studies of these interventions on GYN patients. Based on a proposition from the Good and Moore middle-range theory, 311 patients, age 18-70 in five Midwestern hospitals were randomly assigned using minimization to the three intervention groups or a control group. They were tested during ambulation and rest on postoperative days 1 and 2. Pain was measured with sensation and distress of pain visual analogue scales. Multivariate analysis of covariance of posttest sensation and distress was used with pretest control and apriori contrasts. The intervention groups had significantly less posttest pain than the controls (p=.022 - .001) on the first and second postoperative days. The three interventions were similar in their effect on pain. Patients who received the interventions plus patient controlled analgesia (PCA) had 9% to 27% less pain than controls who used PCA alone. Reduced pain was related to amount of activity (ambulation or rest) and mastery of the use of the intervention; findings were supported by decreased pulse and respiration. Nurses who care for GYN surgical patients can provide soft music and relaxation tapes and instruct patients to use them during postoperative ambulation and also at rest on days 1 and 2.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:30Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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