2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161571
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Work/Family Stress, Learned Resourcefulness, and Women's Health
Abstract:
Work/Family Stress, Learned Resourcefulness, and Women's Health
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Yobas, Piyanee
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Evidence suggests that stress associated with work and family has a negative effect on women's health. Nevertheless, this line of research has been unrecognized and understudied. The aims of this study were: a) to explore the relationships among occupational stress (OS), family stress (FS), poor physical health, and psychological distress among female health care workers, and b) to examine the moderating effect of learned resourcefulness (LR) on the relationship between stress and health. Neuman's system model and Rosenbaum's learned resourcefulness theory provided frameworks for examining the hypothesized relationships among study variables. A cross-sectional, nonexperimental design was used. A convenience sample of 271 female health care workers was recruited from various Northeastern Ohio health care facilities. Data were collected by using self-reported questionnaires, scanned using Teleform Software, and electronically transferred to the SPSS format. Data were analyzed using 2-step structural equation modeling, which suggested that respondents with higher OS reported poorer physical health (beta=.32, p=.000); those experiencing higher FS reported poorer physical health and higher level of psychological distress (beta=.29, p=.000 and beta=.42, p=.000 respectively). Although a moderating effect by LR was not found, highly resourceful persons were less likely to experience OS, FS, physical health problems, and psychological distress. This study uniquely examined factors affecting women's health more comprehensively than previous research. It advances the body of nursing knowledge and has important implications for nursing education and health policy. A course that teaches LR skills for managing stress management may be included in the academic training of future health care professionals. Policy makers and administrative personnel may consider adding this course to staff development and counseling programs in their health care facilities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWork/Family Stress, Learned Resourcefulness, and Women's Healthen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161571-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Work/Family Stress, Learned Resourcefulness, and Women's Health</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yobas, Piyanee</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Evidence suggests that stress associated with work and family has a negative effect on women's health. Nevertheless, this line of research has been unrecognized and understudied. The aims of this study were: a) to explore the relationships among occupational stress (OS), family stress (FS), poor physical health, and psychological distress among female health care workers, and b) to examine the moderating effect of learned resourcefulness (LR) on the relationship between stress and health. Neuman's system model and Rosenbaum's learned resourcefulness theory provided frameworks for examining the hypothesized relationships among study variables. A cross-sectional, nonexperimental design was used. A convenience sample of 271 female health care workers was recruited from various Northeastern Ohio health care facilities. Data were collected by using self-reported questionnaires, scanned using Teleform Software, and electronically transferred to the SPSS format. Data were analyzed using 2-step structural equation modeling, which suggested that respondents with higher OS reported poorer physical health (beta=.32, p=.000); those experiencing higher FS reported poorer physical health and higher level of psychological distress (beta=.29, p=.000 and beta=.42, p=.000 respectively). Although a moderating effect by LR was not found, highly resourceful persons were less likely to experience OS, FS, physical health problems, and psychological distress. This study uniquely examined factors affecting women's health more comprehensively than previous research. It advances the body of nursing knowledge and has important implications for nursing education and health policy. A course that teaches LR skills for managing stress management may be included in the academic training of future health care professionals. Policy makers and administrative personnel may consider adding this course to staff development and counseling programs in their health care facilities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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