Searching for Patient-Specific Health Information on the World Wide Web: an Exploration of Nurses' Search Behavior

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161572
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Searching for Patient-Specific Health Information on the World Wide Web: an Exploration of Nurses' Search Behavior
Abstract:
Searching for Patient-Specific Health Information on the World Wide Web: an Exploration of Nurses' Search Behavior
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Jones, Josette , RN, PhD, BC
P.I. Institution Name:Indiana University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:535 W. Michigan Str, IT 491, Indianapolis, Indiana, 46202, United States
Contact Telephone:317 274 8059
While there is no doubt the World Wide Web (WWW) provides access to an enormous volume and a broad variety of health information, the role of the WWW as an information resource for patient care per se is far less certain. Although the WWW seems to offer nurses what they like about information resources for patient care, nurses have not yet taken fully advantages of this resource for tailored patient education. A foremost barrier cited is the lack of time needed to filter the sheer information to ensure the quality and appropriateness of the retrieved documents for the patient. The aim of this study is exploring nurses' searching and retrieving of patient-specific information on the WWW in the context of work. More specific, the research is focused on identifying variables that affect nurses' searching and retrieving of patient-specific information on the WWW and how these variables resemble or differ from what is already known from research in information sciences. The study is set out to make direct observations of "natural" ongoing systems, while intruding on and disturbing those systems as little as possible. Sixteen nurses in diverse settings are observed searching for patient-specific information on the WWW in two different instances. The study will draw on traditional observational techniques, such as the "Think-Aloud" technique complemented with field notes, search logs and written statements. The models of information searching and retrieving as described by Wilson (1999), Kuhlthau (1991, 1993, 1996), and Belkin (2001) are used as a guiding framework to explore and analyze the information seeking and retrieving process of nurses. The results of the study will be employed for future research related to developing tools and strategies to improve the filtering accuracy of the WWW searching.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleSearching for Patient-Specific Health Information on the World Wide Web: an Exploration of Nurses' Search Behavioren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161572-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Searching for Patient-Specific Health Information on the World Wide Web: an Exploration of Nurses' Search Behavior</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Jones, Josette , RN, PhD, BC</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Indiana University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">535 W. Michigan Str, IT 491, Indianapolis, Indiana, 46202, United States</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">317 274 8059</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jofjones@iupui.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">While there is no doubt the World Wide Web (WWW) provides access to an enormous volume and a broad variety of health information, the role of the WWW as an information resource for patient care per se is far less certain. Although the WWW seems to offer nurses what they like about information resources for patient care, nurses have not yet taken fully advantages of this resource for tailored patient education. A foremost barrier cited is the lack of time needed to filter the sheer information to ensure the quality and appropriateness of the retrieved documents for the patient. The aim of this study is exploring nurses' searching and retrieving of patient-specific information on the WWW in the context of work. More specific, the research is focused on identifying variables that affect nurses' searching and retrieving of patient-specific information on the WWW and how these variables resemble or differ from what is already known from research in information sciences. The study is set out to make direct observations of &quot;natural&quot; ongoing systems, while intruding on and disturbing those systems as little as possible. Sixteen nurses in diverse settings are observed searching for patient-specific information on the WWW in two different instances. The study will draw on traditional observational techniques, such as the &quot;Think-Aloud&quot; technique complemented with field notes, search logs and written statements. The models of information searching and retrieving as described by Wilson (1999), Kuhlthau (1991, 1993, 1996), and Belkin (2001) are used as a guiding framework to explore and analyze the information seeking and retrieving process of nurses. The results of the study will be employed for future research related to developing tools and strategies to improve the filtering accuracy of the WWW searching.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:35Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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