Using Statistical Process Control to Evaluate and Reduce Medication Events in an Acute Care Hospital

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161573
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Statistical Process Control to Evaluate and Reduce Medication Events in an Acute Care Hospital
Abstract:
Using Statistical Process Control to Evaluate and Reduce Medication Events in an Acute Care Hospital
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Buchman, Debra
P.I. Institution Name:Medical College of Ohio
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA
Contact Telephone:419.383.6736
Recent publicity surrounding medication errors resulting in serious harm to patients contributed to the subsequent publication of two reports by the Institute of Medicine that attempted to describe the scope of the problem with patient safety and proposed approaches to reduce "errors" in patient care. In addition, the Joint Commission for Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations expanded its standards for patient safety which has encouraged hospitals to identify valid and reliable methods to define the incidence of medication errors and evaluate the outcomes of programs designed to reduce those events. Nurses have a key role in the process of ordering, administering, and evaluating the effects of medications in the hospital setting. This paper describes an interdisciplinary outcomes project using a performance improvement model with statistical process control for data analyses. The purposes of the project were to develop a valid and reliable method to assess the medication error rates in an acute care setting, describe the characteristics of medication errors in an acute care setting, and test the feasibility of using statistical process control to evaluate appropriate nursing interventions designed to reduce the incidence of medication errors. Medication event data on eight clinical units over three years were examined using control charts to compare error rates quarterly both overall and by unit. Additional analysis was done to examine the outcomes of the error for the patient. Occasions of special cause variation were subjected to secondary analyses with appropriate interventions designed to reduce error rates and increase process control. Overall error rates were reduced with an increase in process control and the effects of specific interventions intended to reduce error rates were reflected in both the overall and unit data. Use of a performance improvement model and statistical process control can be effective in increasing patient safety in acute care settings.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Statistical Process Control to Evaluate and Reduce Medication Events in an Acute Care Hospitalen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161573-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Statistical Process Control to Evaluate and Reduce Medication Events in an Acute Care Hospital</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Buchman, Debra</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Medical College of Ohio</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3000 Arlington Avenue, Toledo, OH, 43614, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">419.383.6736</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">dbuchman@mco.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Recent publicity surrounding medication errors resulting in serious harm to patients contributed to the subsequent publication of two reports by the Institute of Medicine that attempted to describe the scope of the problem with patient safety and proposed approaches to reduce &quot;errors&quot; in patient care. In addition, the Joint Commission for Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations expanded its standards for patient safety which has encouraged hospitals to identify valid and reliable methods to define the incidence of medication errors and evaluate the outcomes of programs designed to reduce those events. Nurses have a key role in the process of ordering, administering, and evaluating the effects of medications in the hospital setting. This paper describes an interdisciplinary outcomes project using a performance improvement model with statistical process control for data analyses. The purposes of the project were to develop a valid and reliable method to assess the medication error rates in an acute care setting, describe the characteristics of medication errors in an acute care setting, and test the feasibility of using statistical process control to evaluate appropriate nursing interventions designed to reduce the incidence of medication errors. Medication event data on eight clinical units over three years were examined using control charts to compare error rates quarterly both overall and by unit. Additional analysis was done to examine the outcomes of the error for the patient. Occasions of special cause variation were subjected to secondary analyses with appropriate interventions designed to reduce error rates and increase process control. Overall error rates were reduced with an increase in process control and the effects of specific interventions intended to reduce error rates were reflected in both the overall and unit data. Use of a performance improvement model and statistical process control can be effective in increasing patient safety in acute care settings.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:36Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:36Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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