2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161577
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Does Perineal Suturing Make a Difference?
Abstract:
Does Perineal Suturing Make a Difference?
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Fleming, Valerie
P.I. Institution Name:Glasgow Caledonian University
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Midwifery & Community Health, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow, Scotland, G4 0BA, United Kingdom
Contact Telephone:44.141.331.3467
In recent years midwives, without the benefit of research, have opted not to suture all perineal lacerations. It appears, however, that at six weeks postpartum these have healed as well as those that have been sutured. This randomized controlled trial has addressed the clinical effectiveness of perineal suturing by examining differences in healing and pain in 300 primiparous women who do and who do not have suturing to perineal lacerations sustained during spontaneous vaginal births between 37 & 42 weeks gestation. Following randomization, into suturing and non-suturing groups the REEDA Tool, a visual analogue scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire were administered to both groups of women at one and ten days and six weeks post partum. This paper presents findings from this study, which show no difference in pain between the two groups at ten days or six weeks post partum. The Approximation aspect of the REEDA evaluation scores in the non sutured group are significantly higher at these two points (p=0.009, and 0.005 respectively) suggesting that healing is slower. This study has potential important implications for women's short and long term health. In addition it has far reaching implications for the professional practice of midwives and doctors.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDoes Perineal Suturing Make a Difference?en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161577-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Does Perineal Suturing Make a Difference?</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Fleming, Valerie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Glasgow Caledonian University</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Midwifery &amp; Community Health, 70 Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow, Scotland, G4 0BA, United Kingdom</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">44.141.331.3467</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">In recent years midwives, without the benefit of research, have opted not to suture all perineal lacerations. It appears, however, that at six weeks postpartum these have healed as well as those that have been sutured. This randomized controlled trial has addressed the clinical effectiveness of perineal suturing by examining differences in healing and pain in 300 primiparous women who do and who do not have suturing to perineal lacerations sustained during spontaneous vaginal births between 37 &amp; 42 weeks gestation. Following randomization, into suturing and non-suturing groups the REEDA Tool, a visual analogue scale and the McGill Pain Questionnaire were administered to both groups of women at one and ten days and six weeks post partum. This paper presents findings from this study, which show no difference in pain between the two groups at ten days or six weeks post partum. The Approximation aspect of the REEDA evaluation scores in the non sutured group are significantly higher at these two points (p=0.009, and 0.005 respectively) suggesting that healing is slower. This study has potential important implications for women's short and long term health. In addition it has far reaching implications for the professional practice of midwives and doctors.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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