Motherhood Too Soon: Maternal Stories of the Experience of Giving Birth Prematurely

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161578
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motherhood Too Soon: Maternal Stories of the Experience of Giving Birth Prematurely
Abstract:
Motherhood Too Soon: Maternal Stories of the Experience of Giving Birth Prematurely
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Broeder, Jennifer
P.I. Institution Name:Saint Louis University
Title:Doctoral Student
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA
This study explores the process of becoming a mother of a preterm infant during infant hospitalization, after discharge home, and within a mother's daily life. The study makes known the demands and concerns of employed mothers of preterm infants by using an interpretive research approach based on interpretive phenomenology. This framework assumes that human beings are constituted by their practices and language. A phenomenological perspective of stress and coping as defined by Lazarus and Folkman (1984), and later extended by Benner and Wrubel (1989) is also taken in this study. The convenience sample consisted of eight mothers who were enrolled within a few weeks of their preterm infants' births. Mothers were recruited from three Midwestern hospitals with level III Neonatal ICUs. The mothers were married and Caucasian. Each mother held a minimum of a high school education and was employed while pregnant. For the mother to be included in the study, her preterm infant was 33 weeks gestational age at birth or less, a first born, a singleton birth, and absent of congenital anomalies. The mothers were interviewed every two weeks while their infants were hospitalized and monthly after infant discharge for four months. Through semi-structured interviews, mothers provided stories of their experiences. This paper presents the findings from the initial interviews with each mother. Rich narrative accounts revealed mothers' ways of coping and what was difficult and meaningful during hospitalization. These mothers found the experience of premature labor and delivery difficult in light of the unknown, their prolonged hospitalizations before the births of their infants, and their concern for their personal health and their babies' health. Meeting the infant for the first time was both meaningful and difficult. Exemplars revealed how the mothers' meanings of pregnancy and their relationships with the fathers influenced their birthing experiences.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotherhood Too Soon: Maternal Stories of the Experience of Giving Birth Prematurelyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161578-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motherhood Too Soon: Maternal Stories of the Experience of Giving Birth Prematurely</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Broeder, Jennifer</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Saint Louis University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Student</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3525 Caroline Street, St. Louis, MO, 63104, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">broederj@slu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study explores the process of becoming a mother of a preterm infant during infant hospitalization, after discharge home, and within a mother's daily life. The study makes known the demands and concerns of employed mothers of preterm infants by using an interpretive research approach based on interpretive phenomenology. This framework assumes that human beings are constituted by their practices and language. A phenomenological perspective of stress and coping as defined by Lazarus and Folkman (1984), and later extended by Benner and Wrubel (1989) is also taken in this study. The convenience sample consisted of eight mothers who were enrolled within a few weeks of their preterm infants' births. Mothers were recruited from three Midwestern hospitals with level III Neonatal ICUs. The mothers were married and Caucasian. Each mother held a minimum of a high school education and was employed while pregnant. For the mother to be included in the study, her preterm infant was 33 weeks gestational age at birth or less, a first born, a singleton birth, and absent of congenital anomalies. The mothers were interviewed every two weeks while their infants were hospitalized and monthly after infant discharge for four months. Through semi-structured interviews, mothers provided stories of their experiences. This paper presents the findings from the initial interviews with each mother. Rich narrative accounts revealed mothers' ways of coping and what was difficult and meaningful during hospitalization. These mothers found the experience of premature labor and delivery difficult in light of the unknown, their prolonged hospitalizations before the births of their infants, and their concern for their personal health and their babies' health. Meeting the infant for the first time was both meaningful and difficult. Exemplars revealed how the mothers' meanings of pregnancy and their relationships with the fathers influenced their birthing experiences.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:41Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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