2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161581
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Competence as Scientific Integrity
Abstract:
Cultural Competence as Scientific Integrity
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Turton (Reynolds), Cheryl
P.I. Institution Name:Northern Michigan University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 3314 New Science Facility, Marquette, MI, 49855-5301, USA
Contact Telephone:906.227.1671
Emphasis on research examining health phenomena within under-represented groups and addressing health disparities mandates that researchers examine and explicate hallmarks of research practices that are scientifically, ethically, and culturally sound. The recent emphasis on research aimed at reducing health disparities reflects concern with social justice, however, it is based upon the assumption that the research design and conduct will provide meaningful information about the group under investigation through production of results that have truth value. The truth value of research cannot be known when it is conducted in an unfamiliar cultural setting or with participants who are enculturated differently from the researcher. Thus, cultural competence of the research team is a critical and necessary step towards ensuring that research results are meaningful and risks worthwhile. Because what might be considered "good practices" in culturally competent research have not been explicated in depth, the author proposes hallmarks for concernful research practices that synthesize cultural competence and scientific integrity for the purpose of providing direction for culturally meaningful research to advance understanding of health phenomena. Suggestions are drawn from nursing literature, from principles, policies or standards of ethnic peoples (particularly aboriginal peoples) regarding education, intellectual property or research, as well as from the research experience of the author with aboriginal peoples in the Great Lakes region of the U.S.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Competence as Scientific Integrityen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161581-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural Competence as Scientific Integrity</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Turton (Reynolds), Cheryl</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Northern Michigan University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 3314 New Science Facility, Marquette, MI, 49855-5301, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">906.227.1671</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cturton@nmu.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Emphasis on research examining health phenomena within under-represented groups and addressing health disparities mandates that researchers examine and explicate hallmarks of research practices that are scientifically, ethically, and culturally sound. The recent emphasis on research aimed at reducing health disparities reflects concern with social justice, however, it is based upon the assumption that the research design and conduct will provide meaningful information about the group under investigation through production of results that have truth value. The truth value of research cannot be known when it is conducted in an unfamiliar cultural setting or with participants who are enculturated differently from the researcher. Thus, cultural competence of the research team is a critical and necessary step towards ensuring that research results are meaningful and risks worthwhile. Because what might be considered &quot;good practices&quot; in culturally competent research have not been explicated in depth, the author proposes hallmarks for concernful research practices that synthesize cultural competence and scientific integrity for the purpose of providing direction for culturally meaningful research to advance understanding of health phenomena. Suggestions are drawn from nursing literature, from principles, policies or standards of ethnic peoples (particularly aboriginal peoples) regarding education, intellectual property or research, as well as from the research experience of the author with aboriginal peoples in the Great Lakes region of the U.S.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:44Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:44Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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