Validation of Measures of Middles Schooler's Self-Efficacy for Physical & Mental Health and Academic Tasks

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161585
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Validation of Measures of Middles Schooler's Self-Efficacy for Physical & Mental Health and Academic Tasks
Abstract:
Validation of Measures of Middles Schooler's Self-Efficacy for Physical & Mental Health and Academic Tasks
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Bray, Christell
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Medical Branch
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX, 77555, USA
Contact Telephone:409.772.8310
Purpose & Framework: Since 1977, self-efficacy has been of interest to healthcare providers as a salient predictor of behaviors. It is of particular interest in the areas of health promotion and lifestyle behaviors (Bandura, 2000). This research sought to validate existing item pools for use with middle school youngsters to measure self-efficacy for routine physical and mental health, and academic behaviors. Instrumentation: The School Health Efficacy Questionnaire (Froman & Owen, 1991, 1999) and two measures of elementary and high schoolers' academic self-efficacy (Owen & Froman, 1989, 1999) provided the item pool. Item wording and content were adapted for middle school youngsters. All original instruments had impressive and supportive reliability and validity evidence for use with originally targeted populations. Sample & Methods: A pool of 114 items was generated and reviewed by 15 expert judges. Content validity procedures (Grant & Davis, 1997) were used to calculate CVI, eliminate, and revise items. Forty-six items were retained for validation with 6th-8th graders from a broad geographic area. Over 350 adolescents were surveyed. Factor analysis, internal consistency estimation and hypothesis testing were used to replicate psychometric documentation available from the original instruments. Results & Conclusions: Factor analyses supported the expected structure of a multifactor physical and mental health instrument and a single factor academic self-efficacy measure. The factor solutions explained approximately 75% of item covariation. Cronbach's alpha estimates for factors were .73, .82, .87, and .89. A single factor emerged from a second order factor analysis, supporting the hypothesis that all items relate to the general self-efficacy construct. Hypothesis testing supported predicted relationships between self-efficacy and grades earned, self-reported anger, and overall health. The validation of these measures for physical and mental health, and academic applications closes the age gap in instruments available to assess school age children's self-efficacy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleValidation of Measures of Middles Schooler's Self-Efficacy for Physical & Mental Health and Academic Tasksen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161585-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Validation of Measures of Middles Schooler's Self-Efficacy for Physical &amp; Mental Health and Academic Tasks</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Bray, Christell</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Medical Branch</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX, 77555, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">409.772.8310</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cbray@utmb.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose &amp; Framework: Since 1977, self-efficacy has been of interest to healthcare providers as a salient predictor of behaviors. It is of particular interest in the areas of health promotion and lifestyle behaviors (Bandura, 2000). This research sought to validate existing item pools for use with middle school youngsters to measure self-efficacy for routine physical and mental health, and academic behaviors. Instrumentation: The School Health Efficacy Questionnaire (Froman &amp; Owen, 1991, 1999) and two measures of elementary and high schoolers' academic self-efficacy (Owen &amp; Froman, 1989, 1999) provided the item pool. Item wording and content were adapted for middle school youngsters. All original instruments had impressive and supportive reliability and validity evidence for use with originally targeted populations. Sample &amp; Methods: A pool of 114 items was generated and reviewed by 15 expert judges. Content validity procedures (Grant &amp; Davis, 1997) were used to calculate CVI, eliminate, and revise items. Forty-six items were retained for validation with 6th-8th graders from a broad geographic area. Over 350 adolescents were surveyed. Factor analysis, internal consistency estimation and hypothesis testing were used to replicate psychometric documentation available from the original instruments. Results &amp; Conclusions: Factor analyses supported the expected structure of a multifactor physical and mental health instrument and a single factor academic self-efficacy measure. The factor solutions explained approximately 75% of item covariation. Cronbach's alpha estimates for factors were .73, .82, .87, and .89. A single factor emerged from a second order factor analysis, supporting the hypothesis that all items relate to the general self-efficacy construct. Hypothesis testing supported predicted relationships between self-efficacy and grades earned, self-reported anger, and overall health. The validation of these measures for physical and mental health, and academic applications closes the age gap in instruments available to assess school age children's self-efficacy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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