Voices of Women Living with HIV/Aids in Southern Africa: Narratives That Reflect Cultural Risk Factors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161592
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Voices of Women Living with HIV/Aids in Southern Africa: Narratives That Reflect Cultural Risk Factors
Abstract:
Voices of Women Living with HIV/Aids in Southern Africa: Narratives That Reflect Cultural Risk Factors
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Tobias, Barbara
P.I. Institution Name:Howard University
Title:Instructor
Contact Address:Division of Nursing, 501 Bryant Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20059, USA
Contact Telephone:202.806.7456
Swaziland has an HIV/AIDS incidence of 25.8 % and the largest group infected is women. In the Seventh HIV Sentinel Serosurveillance Report (2000) 35 % of antennal clients tested positive for HIV. Among female patients treated for tuberculosis, 56% were found to be HIV positive and among those being treated for sexually transmitted infections 58% were HIV positive. In each of these cases women had higher prevalence for HIV than the male clients. Programs for AIDS awareness, education, and reduction are well established in the country. In spite of the abundance of these programs women continue to be in infected with the virus. It appears that knowledge alone is insufficient when attempting to address the rising tide of the HIV/AIDS epidemic among Swazi women. In the presence of extensive education and awareness programs and the continued rise in infection it is important to evaluate the social and psychological factors that might contribute to the decision making process among women of Swaziland. Belief systems, cultural traditions, and perceptions of personal power are all factors that might influence decisions women of Swaziland make to protect themselves or not protect themselves from HIV infection. The cultural context of the Swazi woman's existence greatly impacts her ability to make decisions that will keep her free from HIV infection. The purpose of this study was to explore the contextual experience of women living with HIV/AIDS in Swaziland, Southern Africa.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVoices of Women Living with HIV/Aids in Southern Africa: Narratives That Reflect Cultural Risk Factorsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161592-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Voices of Women Living with HIV/Aids in Southern Africa: Narratives That Reflect Cultural Risk Factors</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Tobias, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Howard University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Instructor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Division of Nursing, 501 Bryant Street, NW, Washington, DC, 20059, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">202.806.7456</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">btobias@howard.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Swaziland has an HIV/AIDS incidence of 25.8 % and the largest group infected is women. In the Seventh HIV Sentinel Serosurveillance Report (2000) 35 % of antennal clients tested positive for HIV. Among female patients treated for tuberculosis, 56% were found to be HIV positive and among those being treated for sexually transmitted infections 58% were HIV positive. In each of these cases women had higher prevalence for HIV than the male clients. Programs for AIDS awareness, education, and reduction are well established in the country. In spite of the abundance of these programs women continue to be in infected with the virus. It appears that knowledge alone is insufficient when attempting to address the rising tide of the HIV/AIDS epidemic among Swazi women. In the presence of extensive education and awareness programs and the continued rise in infection it is important to evaluate the social and psychological factors that might contribute to the decision making process among women of Swaziland. Belief systems, cultural traditions, and perceptions of personal power are all factors that might influence decisions women of Swaziland make to protect themselves or not protect themselves from HIV infection. The cultural context of the Swazi woman's existence greatly impacts her ability to make decisions that will keep her free from HIV infection. The purpose of this study was to explore the contextual experience of women living with HIV/AIDS in Swaziland, Southern Africa.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:56Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:56Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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