2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161593
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Concerns and Dietary Behavior
Abstract:
Health Concerns and Dietary Behavior
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Noureddine, Samar, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:American University of Beirut
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, PO Box 11-0236, Riad El-Solh, Beirut, 1107 2020, Lebanon
Contact Telephone:961.1350000
Since dietary behaviors are implicated as risk factors for both heart disease and cancer, and health concerns have been identified as predictors of dietary behavior in many studies, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between health concerns and eating behaviors in adults. The self-concept framework and the precaution adoption process model provided the theoretical basis for the study. A mailed survey was sent to a convenience sample of 400 middle-aged working adults asking them to list their future hopes and fears and indicate the most important one. Answers were coded into health and non-health related and correlated with the participants' perception of their current health and eating habits. Preliminary findings showed the majority listed health related hopes and fears, with those perceiving their health positively listing less health concerns than those dissatisfied with their health. Most health related hopes were general, such as to remain healthy, and one third hoped to become thinner. Dietary behaviors were healthiest in those who indicated a health related hope as the most important. No relationship was found between health related fears and diet, with the majority of fears unrelated to diet, except for fears of becoming obese in a few participants. The results suggest that future health concerns must be considered important to the individual's self-concept and be perceived as associated with one's dietary patterns for them to motivate healthy eating. Health concerns seem to be more prominent if current health is perceived to be suboptimal. Nurses need to understand how health concerns can motivate healthy eating behavior in adults so they can be targeted in dietary intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Concerns and Dietary Behavioren_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161593-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health Concerns and Dietary Behavior</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Noureddine, Samar, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">American University of Beirut</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, PO Box 11-0236, Riad El-Solh, Beirut, 1107 2020, Lebanon</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">961.1350000</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sn00@aub.edu.lb</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Since dietary behaviors are implicated as risk factors for both heart disease and cancer, and health concerns have been identified as predictors of dietary behavior in many studies, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between health concerns and eating behaviors in adults. The self-concept framework and the precaution adoption process model provided the theoretical basis for the study. A mailed survey was sent to a convenience sample of 400 middle-aged working adults asking them to list their future hopes and fears and indicate the most important one. Answers were coded into health and non-health related and correlated with the participants' perception of their current health and eating habits. Preliminary findings showed the majority listed health related hopes and fears, with those perceiving their health positively listing less health concerns than those dissatisfied with their health. Most health related hopes were general, such as to remain healthy, and one third hoped to become thinner. Dietary behaviors were healthiest in those who indicated a health related hope as the most important. No relationship was found between health related fears and diet, with the majority of fears unrelated to diet, except for fears of becoming obese in a few participants. The results suggest that future health concerns must be considered important to the individual's self-concept and be perceived as associated with one's dietary patterns for them to motivate healthy eating. Health concerns seem to be more prominent if current health is perceived to be suboptimal. Nurses need to understand how health concerns can motivate healthy eating behavior in adults so they can be targeted in dietary intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:57Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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