2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161594
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Methods for Developing Clinical Smoking Phenotypes
Abstract:
Methods for Developing Clinical Smoking Phenotypes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Atwood, Jan, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402.559.6581
Many risky behaviors, including smoking behaviors, are difficult to describe and classify systematically and precisely, e.g., light smokers who are and are not nicotine addicted, smokers with depressive symptoms. Because smoking is likely influenced by gene-environment interaction (adapted Schmidt, et al. (2000) Risk Factor Model), smoking behaviors can be viewed as smoking phenotypes. The purposes of this study were : 1. The pilot development of smoking phenotypes using both qualitative and statistical methods to define then refine the emergent classification, and 2. The assessment of the feasibility of the expert panel method for developing meaningful prototypes and phenotypes, using smoking behaviors as the content area. The second purpose is the focus here, with resultant prototypes and phenotypes as examples. One Provider Panel and one Lay Panel generated prototypes. The current literature base is strong enough to classify the Caucasian non-Hispanics' data into phenotypes. The Provider Panel generated phenotypes, the validity assessments for which included, e.g., Adjusted Kappa to estimate the degree to which the expert panel concurred on the definitional characteristics of each emerging phenotype. The validity criterion was .70. Once validated, the phenotypes will be used: to assess smoking risk, to tailor smoking interventions, to determine behaviors that correlate with various genotypes, and to develop pharmacotherapies based on smoking-related genes. The expert panel method proved to be feasible. Research issues will be presented regarding the methodology of lay/expert panel prototype-to-phenotype development, using nominal group technique as a process guide, plus implications for using this approach for phenotyping many other gene-environment health-related phenomena of clinical and research interest.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMethods for Developing Clinical Smoking Phenotypesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161594-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Methods for Developing Clinical Smoking Phenotypes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Atwood, Jan, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 985330 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402.559.6581</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jatwood@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Many risky behaviors, including smoking behaviors, are difficult to describe and classify systematically and precisely, e.g., light smokers who are and are not nicotine addicted, smokers with depressive symptoms. Because smoking is likely influenced by gene-environment interaction (adapted Schmidt, et al. (2000) Risk Factor Model), smoking behaviors can be viewed as smoking phenotypes. The purposes of this study were : 1. The pilot development of smoking phenotypes using both qualitative and statistical methods to define then refine the emergent classification, and 2. The assessment of the feasibility of the expert panel method for developing meaningful prototypes and phenotypes, using smoking behaviors as the content area. The second purpose is the focus here, with resultant prototypes and phenotypes as examples. One Provider Panel and one Lay Panel generated prototypes. The current literature base is strong enough to classify the Caucasian non-Hispanics' data into phenotypes. The Provider Panel generated phenotypes, the validity assessments for which included, e.g., Adjusted Kappa to estimate the degree to which the expert panel concurred on the definitional characteristics of each emerging phenotype. The validity criterion was .70. Once validated, the phenotypes will be used: to assess smoking risk, to tailor smoking interventions, to determine behaviors that correlate with various genotypes, and to develop pharmacotherapies based on smoking-related genes. The expert panel method proved to be feasible. Research issues will be presented regarding the methodology of lay/expert panel prototype-to-phenotype development, using nominal group technique as a process guide, plus implications for using this approach for phenotyping many other gene-environment health-related phenomena of clinical and research interest.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:58Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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