2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161596
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development and Evaluation of a Clinical Skills Self-Efficacy Measure
Abstract:
Development and Evaluation of a Clinical Skills Self-Efficacy Measure
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Owen, Steven
P.I. Institution Name:University of Texas Medical Branch
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX, 77555, USA
Contact Telephone:409.772.8312
Purpose and Theoretical Framework. Efficacy beliefs have causal influence on behavior (Bandura, 1997). Thus, high self-efficacy for a particular behavior means that a person is more likely to choose, persevere, and succeed at that behavior. With national nursing shortages at all-time highs, it is essential that nursing training programs enhance student clinical skills as well as students' perception of capability. In a practical sense, students lacking confidence may be at risk for graduation and licensure. The objective of this research was to construct a clinical skills self-efficacy (CSSE) measure and begin to evaluate its psychometric properties. Sample and Methods. Four clinical faculty and a measurement specialist developed a large item pool, which was evaluated by five content experts. A final survey of 48 items was wrapped with a pair of 5-point response formats, one asking about respondents' confidence NOW, and a second asking about confidence expected AFTER TWO YEARS of experience. The CSSE was administered to junior and senior BSN students (N=124). Results. The assumption of unidimensionality was tested, and supported, by a series of nested chi-square models comparing 3-, 2-, and 1-factor solutions for each subscale. Reliabilities for the total scales were .97 and .98, respectively. The usual fit indices within a confirmatory factor analysis showed very strong support (.98 to .99) with residual mean square errors of .08 and .09. The smallest factor loading on the NOW scale was .75, and on the LATER scale, .85. Conclusions. Pilot data show considerable promise for this brief instrument. As a larger programmatic effort, CSSE data will now be combined with larger files whose eventual purpose is prediction of clinical GPA and NCLEX-RN performance. If CSSE scores are associated with these criterion measures, it should be possible to identify and intervene more effectively with students who risk failure.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment and Evaluation of a Clinical Skills Self-Efficacy Measureen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161596-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Development and Evaluation of a Clinical Skills Self-Efficacy Measure</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Owen, Steven</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Texas Medical Branch</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 301 University Boulevard, Galveston, TX, 77555, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">409.772.8312</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">svowen@utmb.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose and Theoretical Framework. Efficacy beliefs have causal influence on behavior (Bandura, 1997). Thus, high self-efficacy for a particular behavior means that a person is more likely to choose, persevere, and succeed at that behavior. With national nursing shortages at all-time highs, it is essential that nursing training programs enhance student clinical skills as well as students' perception of capability. In a practical sense, students lacking confidence may be at risk for graduation and licensure. The objective of this research was to construct a clinical skills self-efficacy (CSSE) measure and begin to evaluate its psychometric properties. Sample and Methods. Four clinical faculty and a measurement specialist developed a large item pool, which was evaluated by five content experts. A final survey of 48 items was wrapped with a pair of 5-point response formats, one asking about respondents' confidence NOW, and a second asking about confidence expected AFTER TWO YEARS of experience. The CSSE was administered to junior and senior BSN students (N=124). Results. The assumption of unidimensionality was tested, and supported, by a series of nested chi-square models comparing 3-, 2-, and 1-factor solutions for each subscale. Reliabilities for the total scales were .97 and .98, respectively. The usual fit indices within a confirmatory factor analysis showed very strong support (.98 to .99) with residual mean square errors of .08 and .09. The smallest factor loading on the NOW scale was .75, and on the LATER scale, .85. Conclusions. Pilot data show considerable promise for this brief instrument. As a larger programmatic effort, CSSE data will now be combined with larger files whose eventual purpose is prediction of clinical GPA and NCLEX-RN performance. If CSSE scores are associated with these criterion measures, it should be possible to identify and intervene more effectively with students who risk failure.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:23:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:23:59Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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