The Impact, Benefit, Effectiveness, Sustainability and Outcomes of Nurse-Facilitated Community-Based Efforts for Promoting Breast Health among African American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161604
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Impact, Benefit, Effectiveness, Sustainability and Outcomes of Nurse-Facilitated Community-Based Efforts for Promoting Breast Health among African American Women
Abstract:
The Impact, Benefit, Effectiveness, Sustainability and Outcomes of Nurse-Facilitated Community-Based Efforts for Promoting Breast Health among African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Underwood, Sandra, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Title:Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 767B, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA
Contact Telephone:4142296076
While breast cancer screening is becoming more frequently utilized than was true in the early 1990's, significant under-utilization and irregular utilization by African American women (AAW) remain. The recognition of the relationship between culture, community and cancer has lead breast cancer advocates to design and institute an array of community-based breast cancer screening programs. Included among them are programs that utilized community organizations, faith-based institutions, beauty salons, private homes and family gatherings as the venue through which the programs were instituted. The novelty and innovation proposed has lead many to label these efforts "best practices" for the promotion of breast cancer screening among AAW. Yet, little to no scientific evidence has been presented for peer-review to support or refute propositions relative to the programs' efficacy or effectiveness. This study aimed to fill that void. The study, designed using the PEN-3 Model for Health Education and the Model of Heritage Consistency as it's theoretical base, evaluated the effect of a nurse-facilitated breast cancer screening and early detection intervention (NBCI) on the screening behaviors of at-risk AAW; assess the impact, benefit and sustainability of the NBCI when presented via a community-based, faith-based, salon-based, home-based, and family centered venue; and, assess the effect of the NBCI on the breast cancer knowledge, beliefs, and general health behaviors of the targeted group of AAW. A split group pre-test post-test waiting control group design was used to compare the overall benefit, impact, effectiveness, outcomes and sustainability of the NBCI when implemented within each of the aforementioned venues. Qualitative and quantitative measures were used to assess the outcomes of the proposed intervention when presented via a community-based, faith-based, salon-based, home-based, and family centered venue. In addition, a standard spreadsheet model was constructed and used to calculate the NBCI's cost and cost-effectiveness.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Impact, Benefit, Effectiveness, Sustainability and Outcomes of Nurse-Facilitated Community-Based Efforts for Promoting Breast Health among African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161604-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The Impact, Benefit, Effectiveness, Sustainability and Outcomes of Nurse-Facilitated Community-Based Efforts for Promoting Breast Health among African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Underwood, Sandra, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Cunningham Hall, Room 767B, PO Box 413, Milwaukee, WI, 53201, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">4142296076</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">underwoo@csd4.uwm.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">While breast cancer screening is becoming more frequently utilized than was true in the early 1990's, significant under-utilization and irregular utilization by African American women (AAW) remain. The recognition of the relationship between culture, community and cancer has lead breast cancer advocates to design and institute an array of community-based breast cancer screening programs. Included among them are programs that utilized community organizations, faith-based institutions, beauty salons, private homes and family gatherings as the venue through which the programs were instituted. The novelty and innovation proposed has lead many to label these efforts &quot;best practices&quot; for the promotion of breast cancer screening among AAW. Yet, little to no scientific evidence has been presented for peer-review to support or refute propositions relative to the programs' efficacy or effectiveness. This study aimed to fill that void. The study, designed using the PEN-3 Model for Health Education and the Model of Heritage Consistency as it's theoretical base, evaluated the effect of a nurse-facilitated breast cancer screening and early detection intervention (NBCI) on the screening behaviors of at-risk AAW; assess the impact, benefit and sustainability of the NBCI when presented via a community-based, faith-based, salon-based, home-based, and family centered venue; and, assess the effect of the NBCI on the breast cancer knowledge, beliefs, and general health behaviors of the targeted group of AAW. A split group pre-test post-test waiting control group design was used to compare the overall benefit, impact, effectiveness, outcomes and sustainability of the NBCI when implemented within each of the aforementioned venues. Qualitative and quantitative measures were used to assess the outcomes of the proposed intervention when presented via a community-based, faith-based, salon-based, home-based, and family centered venue. In addition, a standard spreadsheet model was constructed and used to calculate the NBCI's cost and cost-effectiveness. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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