Using Sem to Test the Impact of Chronic Stress Emotions on Hypertension in African Americans

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161608
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Using Sem to Test the Impact of Chronic Stress Emotions on Hypertension in African Americans
Abstract:
Using Sem to Test the Impact of Chronic Stress Emotions on Hypertension in African Americans
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Peters, Rosalind
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 358 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.0342
Structural equation modeling techniques were used to test a theoretical model of Chronic Stress Emotions derived from Lazarus' (1999) Stress and Coping framework. The model proposed that chronically stressful interactions with the social environment result in activation of negatively-toned emotions and that this, in combination with difficulty in emotional regulation, leads to chronic stress emotions and somatic health changes, specifically hypertension. The main concepts examined include: perceived racism; personal resources; alexithymia; emotional-approach coping; expression and control of anger; trait anger; trait anxiety; trait depression; and hypertension. Participants were 162 community dwelling, urban African Americans, 18 to 80 years of age. Measurements included the Racism and Life Experiences Scales, Krieger Racial Discrimination Measure, Emotional Approach to Coping Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, State-Trait Personality Inventory, and automated measures of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Latent variable SEM analysis was conducted. Both the measurement and structural models were examined for overall fit. Re-specification decisions were guided by statistical analysis and theoretical considerations. Additional analyses were done using multiple regression and correlational techniques. Results revealed acceptable overall model fit, with 20% of the variance in hypertension accounted for by the model (33% of variance explained in the women-only group). Eighty-five percent (85%) of the explained variance was attributable to traditional risk factors (e.g., obesity, smoking). Personal resources significantly influenced subjects' ability to regulate emotions, and there was a significant inverse relationship between ability to regulate emotions and the level of chronic stress emotions experienced. A nonsignificant relationship was noted between emotional regulation, chronic stress emotions and hypertension. Significant age-related differences were noted, with older subjects (> 40 years of age) experiencing greater racial discrimination, more hypertension, and more likely to control their anger inward Age was found to moderate the racism and hypertension relationship.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUsing Sem to Test the Impact of Chronic Stress Emotions on Hypertension in African Americansen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161608-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Using Sem to Test the Impact of Chronic Stress Emotions on Hypertension in African Americans</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Peters, Rosalind</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 358 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.0342</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rpeters@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Structural equation modeling techniques were used to test a theoretical model of Chronic Stress Emotions derived from Lazarus' (1999) Stress and Coping framework. The model proposed that chronically stressful interactions with the social environment result in activation of negatively-toned emotions and that this, in combination with difficulty in emotional regulation, leads to chronic stress emotions and somatic health changes, specifically hypertension. The main concepts examined include: perceived racism; personal resources; alexithymia; emotional-approach coping; expression and control of anger; trait anger; trait anxiety; trait depression; and hypertension. Participants were 162 community dwelling, urban African Americans, 18 to 80 years of age. Measurements included the Racism and Life Experiences Scales, Krieger Racial Discrimination Measure, Emotional Approach to Coping Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, State-Trait Personality Inventory, and automated measures of systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Latent variable SEM analysis was conducted. Both the measurement and structural models were examined for overall fit. Re-specification decisions were guided by statistical analysis and theoretical considerations. Additional analyses were done using multiple regression and correlational techniques. Results revealed acceptable overall model fit, with 20% of the variance in hypertension accounted for by the model (33% of variance explained in the women-only group). Eighty-five percent (85%) of the explained variance was attributable to traditional risk factors (e.g., obesity, smoking). Personal resources significantly influenced subjects' ability to regulate emotions, and there was a significant inverse relationship between ability to regulate emotions and the level of chronic stress emotions experienced. A nonsignificant relationship was noted between emotional regulation, chronic stress emotions and hypertension. Significant age-related differences were noted, with older subjects (&gt; 40 years of age) experiencing greater racial discrimination, more hypertension, and more likely to control their anger inward Age was found to moderate the racism and hypertension relationship.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:11Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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