Environmental Factors and Physical Activity in Low-Income, Urban, African American Women

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161609
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Environmental Factors and Physical Activity in Low-Income, Urban, African American Women
Abstract:
Environmental Factors and Physical Activity in Low-Income, Urban, African American Women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Wilbur, JoEllen
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 606 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.7980
Being physically active is one of the most strongly supported behaviors known to prevent cardiovascular disease, but more African American than Caucasian women report minimal to no leisure physical activity and the gap is greatest in persons with less than a high school education. Environmental factors that mediate and influence physical activity in low income ethnic/minority women are largely unknown. The purpose of this survey was to use an ecological model to identify environmental factors that influence physical activity in low income, urban, African American women aged 20 to 50. Based on findings from focus groups conducted by 7 Prevention Research Centers throughout the US a quantitative survey addressing physical environment and sense of community was developed to reflect the unique features of ethnic/minority women. One hundred and sixty-five women residing in four predominantly African American, low income communities on Chicago's West Side were recruited through community workers, social service agencies, clinics and word of mouth for the face-to-face interviews. Most participants were unmarried (87%), 30% had less than a high school education, and 58% were neither employed nor attending school. Over 50% of the women mentioned barriers relating to crime and lack of recreational facilities/programs. The impact of physical and personal environmental barriers on physical activity will be discussed. Findings will inform the development of community-based interventions and policy that are culturally and socially appropriate to the needs of low-income, urban African American women.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnvironmental Factors and Physical Activity in Low-Income, Urban, African American Womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161609-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Environmental Factors and Physical Activity in Low-Income, Urban, African American Women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilbur, JoEllen</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 606 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.7980</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jwilbur@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Being physically active is one of the most strongly supported behaviors known to prevent cardiovascular disease, but more African American than Caucasian women report minimal to no leisure physical activity and the gap is greatest in persons with less than a high school education. Environmental factors that mediate and influence physical activity in low income ethnic/minority women are largely unknown. The purpose of this survey was to use an ecological model to identify environmental factors that influence physical activity in low income, urban, African American women aged 20 to 50. Based on findings from focus groups conducted by 7 Prevention Research Centers throughout the US a quantitative survey addressing physical environment and sense of community was developed to reflect the unique features of ethnic/minority women. One hundred and sixty-five women residing in four predominantly African American, low income communities on Chicago's West Side were recruited through community workers, social service agencies, clinics and word of mouth for the face-to-face interviews. Most participants were unmarried (87%), 30% had less than a high school education, and 58% were neither employed nor attending school. Over 50% of the women mentioned barriers relating to crime and lack of recreational facilities/programs. The impact of physical and personal environmental barriers on physical activity will be discussed. Findings will inform the development of community-based interventions and policy that are culturally and socially appropriate to the needs of low-income, urban African American women.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:12Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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