Developmental Patterns of Physiologic Response to Atvv Intervention in Brain Injured Premature Infants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161610
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Developmental Patterns of Physiologic Response to Atvv Intervention in Brain Injured Premature Infants
Abstract:
Developmental Patterns of Physiologic Response to Atvv Intervention in Brain Injured Premature Infants
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:White-Traut, Rosemary, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor and Department Head
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 806 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.7935
Neonatal brain injury occurs in conjunction with delayed myelination. Delayed myelination during the neonatal period is associated with apnea and bradycardia suggesting that these infants might also show delayed maturation of autonomic nervous system function. The present study measured the development of patterns of HR, RR, and SaO2 between 33 and 35 weeks PCA; determined the effects of different types of brain injury on this development; and evaluated whether the administration of a multi-sensory intervention (Auditory, Vestibular, Visual and Tactile - ATVV) altered this development during hospitalization. Infants born between 23 and 26 weeks gestation with normal head ultrasounds and infants diagnosed with PVL and/or ICH were randomly assigned to control (Group C) and experimental (Group E) groups. Group E infants received ATVV intervention twice daily from 33 weeks until discharge to home. HR, RR and SaO2were monitored and behavioral state was judged prior to, during and after the intervention. Repeated measures ANOVA calculated differences between Groups C and E and within the groups for type of brain injury. Significant differences were detected between Groups C and E for HR and RR. Over the three weeks, a decrease in mean HR and RR was found in most comparisons, but SaO2 remained stable between 33-35 weeks. Separate repeated measures ANOVAs for infants with and without brain injury showed similar patterns of change for HR and RR, involving declines in baseline or resting values. However, when analyzed by type of brain injury, experimental infants with PVL tended to show increases in HR. Elevated mean heart rates for infants with PVL suggested greater risk for decelerative HR changes and associated clinical compromise. The absence of a weekly decline in HR and RR suggests that the diagnosis of PVL may affect maturation of the ANS and associated recommendations for therapy.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopmental Patterns of Physiologic Response to Atvv Intervention in Brain Injured Premature Infantsen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161610-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Developmental Patterns of Physiologic Response to Atvv Intervention in Brain Injured Premature Infants</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White-Traut, Rosemary, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Department Head</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 806 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.7935</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rwt@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Neonatal brain injury occurs in conjunction with delayed myelination. Delayed myelination during the neonatal period is associated with apnea and bradycardia suggesting that these infants might also show delayed maturation of autonomic nervous system function. The present study measured the development of patterns of HR, RR, and SaO2 between 33 and 35 weeks PCA; determined the effects of different types of brain injury on this development; and evaluated whether the administration of a multi-sensory intervention (Auditory, Vestibular, Visual and Tactile - ATVV) altered this development during hospitalization. Infants born between 23 and 26 weeks gestation with normal head ultrasounds and infants diagnosed with PVL and/or ICH were randomly assigned to control (Group C) and experimental (Group E) groups. Group E infants received ATVV intervention twice daily from 33 weeks until discharge to home. HR, RR and SaO2were monitored and behavioral state was judged prior to, during and after the intervention. Repeated measures ANOVA calculated differences between Groups C and E and within the groups for type of brain injury. Significant differences were detected between Groups C and E for HR and RR. Over the three weeks, a decrease in mean HR and RR was found in most comparisons, but SaO2 remained stable between 33-35 weeks. Separate repeated measures ANOVAs for infants with and without brain injury showed similar patterns of change for HR and RR, involving declines in baseline or resting values. However, when analyzed by type of brain injury, experimental infants with PVL tended to show increases in HR. Elevated mean heart rates for infants with PVL suggested greater risk for decelerative HR changes and associated clinical compromise. The absence of a weekly decline in HR and RR suggests that the diagnosis of PVL may affect maturation of the ANS and associated recommendations for therapy.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:13Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.