2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161611
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Feeding Responses of Preterm Infants to Atvv Intervention
Abstract:
Feeding Responses of Preterm Infants to Atvv Intervention
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:White-Traut, Rosemary, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor and Department Head
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 806 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.7935
This study determined whether the use of a multi-sensory intervention administered immediately prior to feeding modified preterm infants' behavioral state from sleep to alertness, increased pre-feeding behaviors and improved infants' oral feeding efficiency. A convenience sample of 22 stable preterm infants was randomly assigned to a control (Group C) or experimental group (Group E). Infants were studied when oral feeding was instituted. Group C infants received routine care. In addition to routine care, Group E infants received 15 minutes of multi-sensory (ATVV) intervention 20 minutes prior to three consecutive feedings. The ATVV intervention included a ten-minute head-to-toe body massage (tactile), during which time the researcher attempted to maintain eye-to-eye contact (visual), while talking softly (auditory) to the infant. The massage was followed by five minutes of rocking (vestibular). Infants were videotaped during the 5-minute baseline interval, during the intervention and for three minutes following completion of the intervention. A research assistant blind to the purpose of the study reviewed videotapes and judged behavioral state and pre-feeding behaviors. Feeding efficiency was evaluated as volume ingested and the length (time) of each oral feeding. Group E infants were more alert prior to feeding (p=. 000), had more total pre-feeding behaviors, had a higher frequency of pre-feeding behaviors at each consecutive feeding (p=. 000) and had an 11 ml higher volume intake by the third feeding (p=. 000) when compared with controls. Feeding time increased over the three feedings by almost four minutes for Group C infants while Group E infants showed reduced length of feeding over the three feedings by approximately one minute. The findings suggest that infants progressed in their ability to demonstrate pre-feeding behaviors with each subsequent intervention session and these changes, along with changes in behavioral state may have impacted the experimental group's feeding efficiency.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFeeding Responses of Preterm Infants to Atvv Interventionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161611-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Feeding Responses of Preterm Infants to Atvv Intervention</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">White-Traut, Rosemary, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor and Department Head</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 806 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.7935</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rwt@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study determined whether the use of a multi-sensory intervention administered immediately prior to feeding modified preterm infants' behavioral state from sleep to alertness, increased pre-feeding behaviors and improved infants' oral feeding efficiency. A convenience sample of 22 stable preterm infants was randomly assigned to a control (Group C) or experimental group (Group E). Infants were studied when oral feeding was instituted. Group C infants received routine care. In addition to routine care, Group E infants received 15 minutes of multi-sensory (ATVV) intervention 20 minutes prior to three consecutive feedings. The ATVV intervention included a ten-minute head-to-toe body massage (tactile), during which time the researcher attempted to maintain eye-to-eye contact (visual), while talking softly (auditory) to the infant. The massage was followed by five minutes of rocking (vestibular). Infants were videotaped during the 5-minute baseline interval, during the intervention and for three minutes following completion of the intervention. A research assistant blind to the purpose of the study reviewed videotapes and judged behavioral state and pre-feeding behaviors. Feeding efficiency was evaluated as volume ingested and the length (time) of each oral feeding. Group E infants were more alert prior to feeding (p=. 000), had more total pre-feeding behaviors, had a higher frequency of pre-feeding behaviors at each consecutive feeding (p=. 000) and had an 11 ml higher volume intake by the third feeding (p=. 000) when compared with controls. Feeding time increased over the three feedings by almost four minutes for Group C infants while Group E infants showed reduced length of feeding over the three feedings by approximately one minute. The findings suggest that infants progressed in their ability to demonstrate pre-feeding behaviors with each subsequent intervention session and these changes, along with changes in behavioral state may have impacted the experimental group's feeding efficiency.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:14Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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