Enhancing Validity and Comprehensiveness of Qualitative Data through Triangulation of Methods, Data Sources, and Data Collectors: Studying Family Functioning in Low-Income African American Single-Parent Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161617
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Enhancing Validity and Comprehensiveness of Qualitative Data through Triangulation of Methods, Data Sources, and Data Collectors: Studying Family Functioning in Low-Income African American Single-Parent Families
Abstract:
Enhancing Validity and Comprehensiveness of Qualitative Data through Triangulation of Methods, Data Sources, and Data Collectors: Studying Family Functioning in Low-Income African American Single-Parent Families
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:McCreary, Linda
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Postdoctoral Research Trainee
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 611 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.2180
Family functioning is a multidimensional construct that is influenced by factors such as culture, SES, family structure, and developmental stage. According to symbolic interactionism, family functioning interactions are based upon shared meanings derived from interpersonal experiences, perceptions of events, and cultural beliefs. Those working clinically or conducting research with families often need to assess their functioning as a family. Evidence suggests that existing family measures, developed for middle-income, White American, two-parent families, may not validly assess family functioning in low-income, African American single-parent families. With the long-term goal of developing a culturally appropriate instrument to assess family functioning in these families, the purpose of this study was to investigate the validity and comprehensiveness of results from a previous study of family functioning conducted with this population by the P.I. The previous study used individual interviews conducted by a White American interviewer with 20 low-income African American single mothers of young children and 20 of their adult family members. The current study consisted of 4 focus groups conducted by an African American group facilitator with a total of 37 demographically similar single mothers. Both studies centered on activities and interactions of family functioning and behaviors associated with effective and ineffective families. Analysis of data from the two studies allowed triangulation of methods (individual interviews vs. focus groups), data sources (mothers and adult family members vs. mothers only), and data collectors (White American vs. African American). Content analysis of both data sets revealed the components of family functioning, specific activities and interactions within each component, and specific behaviors associated with effective and ineffective family functioning. Quite similar results were found in both studies, giving evidence of validity and comprehensiveness of each. Additionally, these findings support the idea that White American investigators employing cultural sensitivity can conduct valid research with minority populations.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEnhancing Validity and Comprehensiveness of Qualitative Data through Triangulation of Methods, Data Sources, and Data Collectors: Studying Family Functioning in Low-Income African American Single-Parent Familiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161617-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Enhancing Validity and Comprehensiveness of Qualitative Data through Triangulation of Methods, Data Sources, and Data Collectors: Studying Family Functioning in Low-Income African American Single-Parent Families</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">McCreary, Linda</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Postdoctoral Research Trainee</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 611 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.2180</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">mccreary@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Family functioning is a multidimensional construct that is influenced by factors such as culture, SES, family structure, and developmental stage. According to symbolic interactionism, family functioning interactions are based upon shared meanings derived from interpersonal experiences, perceptions of events, and cultural beliefs. Those working clinically or conducting research with families often need to assess their functioning as a family. Evidence suggests that existing family measures, developed for middle-income, White American, two-parent families, may not validly assess family functioning in low-income, African American single-parent families. With the long-term goal of developing a culturally appropriate instrument to assess family functioning in these families, the purpose of this study was to investigate the validity and comprehensiveness of results from a previous study of family functioning conducted with this population by the P.I. The previous study used individual interviews conducted by a White American interviewer with 20 low-income African American single mothers of young children and 20 of their adult family members. The current study consisted of 4 focus groups conducted by an African American group facilitator with a total of 37 demographically similar single mothers. Both studies centered on activities and interactions of family functioning and behaviors associated with effective and ineffective families. Analysis of data from the two studies allowed triangulation of methods (individual interviews vs. focus groups), data sources (mothers and adult family members vs. mothers only), and data collectors (White American vs. African American). Content analysis of both data sets revealed the components of family functioning, specific activities and interactions within each component, and specific behaviors associated with effective and ineffective family functioning. Quite similar results were found in both studies, giving evidence of validity and comprehensiveness of each. Additionally, these findings support the idea that White American investigators employing cultural sensitivity can conduct valid research with minority populations.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:20Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:20Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.