Gender Differences in Psychological Distress among Immigrants from the Former Soviet Union

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161618
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Gender Differences in Psychological Distress among Immigrants from the Former Soviet Union
Abstract:
Gender Differences in Psychological Distress among Immigrants from the Former Soviet Union
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Aroian, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 356 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:313.577.6251
Immigrant women, in general, have higher rates of psychological distress than immigrant men do. Yet, the reasons for gender differences are unclear. Gender comparisons are needed to determine whether the demographic and migration characteristics typically associated with immigrants' distress have differential implications for women and men. This study compared rates and correlates of psychological distress among immigrant women and men from the former Soviet Union (FSU). A gender role framework guided the choice of variables for inquiry within the context of the sending country - - a formerly communist country with relatively egalitarian gender roles in the public sector. For example, social relationships were expected to be of greater import for women but work was expected to be of equal import for both genders. A demographic and migration questionnaire and the Symptom Checklist-90-R were administered to 935 female and 706 male former Soviet immigrants to the US. Gender differences in demographic and migration characteristics and psychological distress were examined using Chi square and ANOVA. Gender specific data analyses were performed using multiple regression. Women reported significantly more distress than men did. Correlates of distress differed somewhat by gender. Older age and less time in the US predicted distress in both gender groups. However, having less education, leaving relatives behind, and not being sponsored by friends or a religious organization predicted greater distress for women. For men, being married and retired predicted greater distress. These findings suggest altering assessment and intervention parameters by gender. Personal and social resources are more important for women, although family sponsorship may impose relational demands on women for reciprocity. Retired, married men, on the other hand, may be more distressed because they are not fulfilling their usual role as family breadwinner.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGender Differences in Psychological Distress among Immigrants from the Former Soviet Unionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161618-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Gender Differences in Psychological Distress among Immigrants from the Former Soviet Union</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Aroian, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 356 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">313.577.6251</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">aroian@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Immigrant women, in general, have higher rates of psychological distress than immigrant men do. Yet, the reasons for gender differences are unclear. Gender comparisons are needed to determine whether the demographic and migration characteristics typically associated with immigrants' distress have differential implications for women and men. This study compared rates and correlates of psychological distress among immigrant women and men from the former Soviet Union (FSU). A gender role framework guided the choice of variables for inquiry within the context of the sending country - - a formerly communist country with relatively egalitarian gender roles in the public sector. For example, social relationships were expected to be of greater import for women but work was expected to be of equal import for both genders. A demographic and migration questionnaire and the Symptom Checklist-90-R were administered to 935 female and 706 male former Soviet immigrants to the US. Gender differences in demographic and migration characteristics and psychological distress were examined using Chi square and ANOVA. Gender specific data analyses were performed using multiple regression. Women reported significantly more distress than men did. Correlates of distress differed somewhat by gender. Older age and less time in the US predicted distress in both gender groups. However, having less education, leaving relatives behind, and not being sponsored by friends or a religious organization predicted greater distress for women. For men, being married and retired predicted greater distress. These findings suggest altering assessment and intervention parameters by gender. Personal and social resources are more important for women, although family sponsorship may impose relational demands on women for reciprocity. Retired, married men, on the other hand, may be more distressed because they are not fulfilling their usual role as family breadwinner.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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