Stimulation of the Lateral Hypothalamus Produces Analgesia Mediated by Serotonin Receptors in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161620
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Stimulation of the Lateral Hypothalamus Produces Analgesia Mediated by Serotonin Receptors in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn
Abstract:
Stimulation of the Lateral Hypothalamus Produces Analgesia Mediated by Serotonin Receptors in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Holden, Janean, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 718 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.7907
The availability of adequate treatments for pain is a concern for clinicians in a variety of settings. One way to improve pain treatment may be to understand how the body modulates incoming pain stimuli, a process called endogenous analgesia. Electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) produces analgesia in the spinal cord dorsal horn that is blocked by intrathecal injection of the non-specific serotonin (5HT) antagonist methysergide, suggesting that the LH mediates endogenous analgesia in part through serotonergic receptors in the dorsal horn. However, this electrical stimulation, which activates not only neurons in an area, but also axonal fibers passing through the area, does not provide definitive evidence for involvement of the LH in serotonin-mediated analgesia. To further define the role of the LH in endogenous analgesia, we microinjected the cholinergic agonist carbachol (125 nmol/0.05 µl) into the LH of female Sprague-Dawley rats (25-275 g) and obtained an analgesic response on the tail flick test that lasted 25 minutes compared to control animals (6.40 ± 0.4 vs. 3.30 ± 0.1, p < 0.05). Following LH stimulation, methysergide (97 nmol) was injected intrathecally. No significant change in analgesic effect was observed. However, intrathecal injection of the specific 5HT1A receptor antagonist (S)-way dihydrochloride (97 nmol) or the specific 5HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron (97 nmol) produced a significant blockade of the analgesic effect induced from LH stimulation (two way ANOVA with repeated measures, p < 0.001). These findings provide evidence that the LH produces endogenous analgesia mediated in part by serotonergic 5HT1A and 5HT3 receptor subtypes in the dorsal horn. Supported by: USPHS grant NR04778 from the National Institute of Nursing Research.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStimulation of the Lateral Hypothalamus Produces Analgesia Mediated by Serotonin Receptors in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Hornen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161620-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Stimulation of the Lateral Hypothalamus Produces Analgesia Mediated by Serotonin Receptors in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Holden, Janean, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 718 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.7907</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jeholden@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The availability of adequate treatments for pain is a concern for clinicians in a variety of settings. One way to improve pain treatment may be to understand how the body modulates incoming pain stimuli, a process called endogenous analgesia. Electrical stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) produces analgesia in the spinal cord dorsal horn that is blocked by intrathecal injection of the non-specific serotonin (5HT) antagonist methysergide, suggesting that the LH mediates endogenous analgesia in part through serotonergic receptors in the dorsal horn. However, this electrical stimulation, which activates not only neurons in an area, but also axonal fibers passing through the area, does not provide definitive evidence for involvement of the LH in serotonin-mediated analgesia. To further define the role of the LH in endogenous analgesia, we microinjected the cholinergic agonist carbachol (125 nmol/0.05 &micro;l) into the LH of female Sprague-Dawley rats (25-275 g) and obtained an analgesic response on the tail flick test that lasted 25 minutes compared to control animals (6.40 &plusmn; 0.4 vs. 3.30 &plusmn; 0.1, p &lt; 0.05). Following LH stimulation, methysergide (97 nmol) was injected intrathecally. No significant change in analgesic effect was observed. However, intrathecal injection of the specific 5HT1A receptor antagonist (S)-way dihydrochloride (97 nmol) or the specific 5HT3 receptor antagonist tropisetron (97 nmol) produced a significant blockade of the analgesic effect induced from LH stimulation (two way ANOVA with repeated measures, p &lt; 0.001). These findings provide evidence that the LH produces endogenous analgesia mediated in part by serotonergic 5HT1A and 5HT3 receptor subtypes in the dorsal horn. Supported by: USPHS grant NR04778 from the National Institute of Nursing Research.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:23Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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