Adaptation to Chronic Pain: Religious and Non-Religious Coping in Judeo-Christian Elders

22.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161628
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Adaptation to Chronic Pain: Religious and Non-Religious Coping in Judeo-Christian Elders
Abstract:
Adaptation to Chronic Pain: Religious and Non-Religious Coping in Judeo-Christian Elders
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Dunn, Karen, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Wayne State University
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 112 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA
Contact Telephone:248.370.4658
The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of religious and non-religious coping on the relationships between chronic pain and the health outcomes of functional ability, depression, and spiritual well being. A cross-sectional, correlational survey design was used to test a middle-range theory of adaptation to chronic pain (ACP), derived from the Roy Adaptation Model, using structural equation modeling. The study sample consisted of 200 community-dwelling older adults from Midwestern City. The mean age was 76 years. 77% were female and 23% were male; 79.5% were Caucasian and 20.5% were Non-white. The results of correlational analyses indicated that age, gender, and race were not significantly related to the level of pain intensity experienced by the elders. Women (ƒÒ=.16) and Non-white participants (Beta=.36) reported using religious coping strategies more often than did men and Whites. Higher pain intensity was found to be related to higher levels of functional disability (Beta=.46), depression (Beta=.27), and lower levels of spiritual well-being (Beta=-.16), after controlling for other variables in the model. Elders with higher pain intensity reported using more collaborative religious coping strategies and non-religious behavioral coping strategies to manage their pain. The use of religious coping and non-religious coping strategies did not mediate the relationship between total pain intensity and the three health outcomes. However, elders that reported using religious coping more often were less functionally disabled (Beta=-.11), less depressed (Beta=-.26), and had higher levels of spiritual well-being (Beta=.58). Elders that were more functionally disabled used more non-religious coping strategies (Beta=.33). Thus, the results of this study supported the importance of both religious and non-religious strategies for coping with chronic pain among elderly adults. Implications for nursing research and practice will be discussed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdaptation to Chronic Pain: Religious and Non-Religious Coping in Judeo-Christian Eldersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161628-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Adaptation to Chronic Pain: Religious and Non-Religious Coping in Judeo-Christian Elders</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Dunn, Karen, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Wayne State University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 112 Cohn, 5557 Cass Avenue, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">248.370.4658</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">karen.dunn@wayne.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of religious and non-religious coping on the relationships between chronic pain and the health outcomes of functional ability, depression, and spiritual well being. A cross-sectional, correlational survey design was used to test a middle-range theory of adaptation to chronic pain (ACP), derived from the Roy Adaptation Model, using structural equation modeling. The study sample consisted of 200 community-dwelling older adults from Midwestern City. The mean age was 76 years. 77% were female and 23% were male; 79.5% were Caucasian and 20.5% were Non-white. The results of correlational analyses indicated that age, gender, and race were not significantly related to the level of pain intensity experienced by the elders. Women (&fnof;&Ograve;=.16) and Non-white participants (Beta=.36) reported using religious coping strategies more often than did men and Whites. Higher pain intensity was found to be related to higher levels of functional disability (Beta=.46), depression (Beta=.27), and lower levels of spiritual well-being (Beta=-.16), after controlling for other variables in the model. Elders with higher pain intensity reported using more collaborative religious coping strategies and non-religious behavioral coping strategies to manage their pain. The use of religious coping and non-religious coping strategies did not mediate the relationship between total pain intensity and the three health outcomes. However, elders that reported using religious coping more often were less functionally disabled (Beta=-.11), less depressed (Beta=-.26), and had higher levels of spiritual well-being (Beta=.58). Elders that were more functionally disabled used more non-religious coping strategies (Beta=.33). Thus, the results of this study supported the importance of both religious and non-religious strategies for coping with chronic pain among elderly adults. Implications for nursing research and practice will be discussed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:32Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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