2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161629
Type:
Presentation
Title:
African American Elders: End-of-Life Perspectives
Abstract:
African American Elders: End-of-Life Perspectives
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Wilson, Sarah, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Marquette University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, Clark Hall 319, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA
Contact Telephone:414.288.3860
Beliefs and attitudes toward dying and death are an integral part of culture. The customs practiced in the care of the sick and dying and places of care for ill persons are part of cultural configurations. The influence of cultural on death, dying and bereavement has been neglected in research (Wass & Neimeyer, 1995). If health care providers desire to change the experience of death and dying in the Untied States they need to become better acquainted with the beliefs about death and dying in diverse cultures. Culture is performative and interpretive and provides a framework for studying end of life care. Human behavior can be interpreted through the lens of culture. The specific aims of this study are to: (a) describe urban African American elders beliefs, values, and concerns about end of life care, (b) describe urban African American elders expectations of health care providers at the end of life, and (c) determine African American elders knowledge of end of life care options. A modified ethnographic approach was used in this study. The religious community and parish nurses were utilized to facilitate access to the African American elders. Data collection methods included: (a) interviews with elders, clergy, church lay leaders, parish nurses, funeral directors and (b) field notes. Data are being analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. A community advisory board comprised of clergy, funeral directors, lay leaders in church, and parish nurses was convened to assist the investigator with establishing credibility and trust in the community. The community advisory board is acting as a cultural broker and reviewing aggregate data to enhance the validity of the investigator's interpretation of findings. The results of the study will provide a foundation for future research to design and test interventions for culturally sensitive end-of-life care for African American elders.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAfrican American Elders: End-of-Life Perspectivesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161629-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">African American Elders: End-of-Life Perspectives</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wilson, Sarah, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Marquette University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, Clark Hall 319, PO Box 1881, Milwaukee, WI, 53201-1881, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">414.288.3860</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sarah.wilson@marquette.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Beliefs and attitudes toward dying and death are an integral part of culture. The customs practiced in the care of the sick and dying and places of care for ill persons are part of cultural configurations. The influence of cultural on death, dying and bereavement has been neglected in research (Wass &amp; Neimeyer, 1995). If health care providers desire to change the experience of death and dying in the Untied States they need to become better acquainted with the beliefs about death and dying in diverse cultures. Culture is performative and interpretive and provides a framework for studying end of life care. Human behavior can be interpreted through the lens of culture. The specific aims of this study are to: (a) describe urban African American elders beliefs, values, and concerns about end of life care, (b) describe urban African American elders expectations of health care providers at the end of life, and (c) determine African American elders knowledge of end of life care options. A modified ethnographic approach was used in this study. The religious community and parish nurses were utilized to facilitate access to the African American elders. Data collection methods included: (a) interviews with elders, clergy, church lay leaders, parish nurses, funeral directors and (b) field notes. Data are being analyzed using qualitative thematic analysis. A community advisory board comprised of clergy, funeral directors, lay leaders in church, and parish nurses was convened to assist the investigator with establishing credibility and trust in the community. The community advisory board is acting as a cultural broker and reviewing aggregate data to enhance the validity of the investigator's interpretation of findings. The results of the study will provide a foundation for future research to design and test interventions for culturally sensitive end-of-life care for African American elders.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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