2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161630
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Alzheimer's Disease Behaviors from past Self Identities
Abstract:
Alzheimer's Disease Behaviors from past Self Identities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Harrison, Barbara
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Doctoral Candidate
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, Rm 2160, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Dementia behaviors (DB) are influenced by many factors, including memory and cognition. Memories about one's self-identity may be a factor in a subset of DB described as "behaviors from past self-identities" (BPSI). BPSI are defined as recurrent actions from memories of a past self-identity which are now incongruent with the current environment. Examples of BPSI include calling out for their children and eloping to go to "work". Although importance of past self-identity among dementia subjects has been explored, there are no studies of DB in relation to past self-identity and current DB tools do not identify behaviors that relate to self referenced memories. Therefore, the purpose of this pilot study was to develop and test screening questions for BPSI. Clinical criteria for BPSI were defined and four screening questions were developed for use with family caregivers. Specific aims were to determine if the questions were (1) understood by family members; (2) sufficient to identify BPSI, and (3) estimate the prevalence of BPSI in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) population. Twenty (20) family caregivers of AD patients with mild to moderate dementia were interviewed through Cognitive Disorder Clinic. Results show that a majority of caregivers (19 0f 20) understood the questions. Eight caregivers needed further questions to identify BPSI and lead to modifying BPSI questions. Five caregivers identified BPSI in the past month. Another four caregivers reported that their AD family member had BPSI but not in the past month. Prevalence of BPSI was estimated at twenty-five percent of mild to moderate AD subjects. We conclude that BPSI are common behaviors in the mild to moderate AD subjects and can be identified by caregivers. These findings form the basis for the next study which will explore memory and cognitive function as factors influencing BPSI in AD patients.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAlzheimer's Disease Behaviors from past Self Identitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161630-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Alzheimer's Disease Behaviors from past Self Identities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Harrison, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Doctoral Candidate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, Rm 2160, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">bhn@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Dementia behaviors (DB) are influenced by many factors, including memory and cognition. Memories about one's self-identity may be a factor in a subset of DB described as &quot;behaviors from past self-identities&quot; (BPSI). BPSI are defined as recurrent actions from memories of a past self-identity which are now incongruent with the current environment. Examples of BPSI include calling out for their children and eloping to go to &quot;work&quot;. Although importance of past self-identity among dementia subjects has been explored, there are no studies of DB in relation to past self-identity and current DB tools do not identify behaviors that relate to self referenced memories. Therefore, the purpose of this pilot study was to develop and test screening questions for BPSI. Clinical criteria for BPSI were defined and four screening questions were developed for use with family caregivers. Specific aims were to determine if the questions were (1) understood by family members; (2) sufficient to identify BPSI, and (3) estimate the prevalence of BPSI in an Alzheimer's disease (AD) population. Twenty (20) family caregivers of AD patients with mild to moderate dementia were interviewed through Cognitive Disorder Clinic. Results show that a majority of caregivers (19 0f 20) understood the questions. Eight caregivers needed further questions to identify BPSI and lead to modifying BPSI questions. Five caregivers identified BPSI in the past month. Another four caregivers reported that their AD family member had BPSI but not in the past month. Prevalence of BPSI was estimated at twenty-five percent of mild to moderate AD subjects. We conclude that BPSI are common behaviors in the mild to moderate AD subjects and can be identified by caregivers. These findings form the basis for the next study which will explore memory and cognitive function as factors influencing BPSI in AD patients.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:34Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:34Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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