2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161633
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cognitive Representations of Fatigue in Women with Gynecologic Cancers
Abstract:
Cognitive Representations of Fatigue in Women with Gynecologic Cancers
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Donovan, Heidi
P.I. Institution Name:University of Wisconsin
Title:Fellow
Contact Address:School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA
Contact Telephone:608.257.9529
Purpose: Fatigue is one of the most prevalent, distressing and difficult to manage symptoms associated with the cancer experience. The factors that impact persons' efforts at and success in managing fatigue are not well understood. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the relationship between cognitive representations of fatigue and coping efforts in women receiving chemotherapy for gynecologic cancers. Conceptual Framework: The Common-Sense Model (CSM) served as a guide for this study. The CSM asserts that individuals have cognitive representations (ideas regarding the identity, cause, timeline, consequences, and controllability) of health problems that guide how they cope with those problems. Sample/Methods: 49 women with gynecologic cancers completed the Symptom Representation Questionnaire (SRQ) and the Symptom Management Questionnaire (SMQ) 7 days after receiving chemotherapy. Results: Forty-six women (93.88%) experienced fatigue in the past week. Twenty-seven women (55%) who ranked fatigue in the top 3 "most noticed" symptoms in the past week completed the SRQ and SMQ for fatigue. These women reported a mean (SD) severity score of 6.48 (2.43) (scale 0-10), a mean (SD) consequences score of 3.43 (0.98), and an uncontrollability score of 3.42 (.99) (scale 1-5). Seven (26%) viewed fatigue as a permanent symptom. Sixteen women (59.26%) had not discussed fatigue with a HCP at their last appointment, and 10 (37.0%) had no active strategies for managing fatigue. The perception that fatigue was due to cancer was associated with increased fatigue related coping efforts (r=0.50;p<.05). Conclusions: This study provides valuable information about fatigue in women with gynecologic cancers. Women may have fatalistic attitudes regarding fatigue. Many women did not talk about fatigue with HCP's, nor did they engage in active coping efforts. HCP's should encourage women with gynecologic cancer to talk about fatigue. Efforts must continue to develop and test strategies for managing fatigue.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCognitive Representations of Fatigue in Women with Gynecologic Cancersen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161633-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cognitive Representations of Fatigue in Women with Gynecologic Cancers</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Donovan, Heidi</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Wisconsin</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Fellow</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, Clinical Sciences Center H6/150, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI, 53792-2455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">608.257.9529</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">hsdonova@wisc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Purpose: Fatigue is one of the most prevalent, distressing and difficult to manage symptoms associated with the cancer experience. The factors that impact persons' efforts at and success in managing fatigue are not well understood. The purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the relationship between cognitive representations of fatigue and coping efforts in women receiving chemotherapy for gynecologic cancers. Conceptual Framework: The Common-Sense Model (CSM) served as a guide for this study. The CSM asserts that individuals have cognitive representations (ideas regarding the identity, cause, timeline, consequences, and controllability) of health problems that guide how they cope with those problems. Sample/Methods: 49 women with gynecologic cancers completed the Symptom Representation Questionnaire (SRQ) and the Symptom Management Questionnaire (SMQ) 7 days after receiving chemotherapy. Results: Forty-six women (93.88%) experienced fatigue in the past week. Twenty-seven women (55%) who ranked fatigue in the top 3 &quot;most noticed&quot; symptoms in the past week completed the SRQ and SMQ for fatigue. These women reported a mean (SD) severity score of 6.48 (2.43) (scale 0-10), a mean (SD) consequences score of 3.43 (0.98), and an uncontrollability score of 3.42 (.99) (scale 1-5). Seven (26%) viewed fatigue as a permanent symptom. Sixteen women (59.26%) had not discussed fatigue with a HCP at their last appointment, and 10 (37.0%) had no active strategies for managing fatigue. The perception that fatigue was due to cancer was associated with increased fatigue related coping efforts (r=0.50;p&lt;.05). Conclusions: This study provides valuable information about fatigue in women with gynecologic cancers. Women may have fatalistic attitudes regarding fatigue. Many women did not talk about fatigue with HCP's, nor did they engage in active coping efforts. HCP's should encourage women with gynecologic cancer to talk about fatigue. Efforts must continue to develop and test strategies for managing fatigue.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:37Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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