2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161634
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Complementary Therapies Use: Antecedents and Quality of Life Outcomes
Abstract:
Complementary Therapies Use: Antecedents and Quality of Life Outcomes
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Matthees, Barbara
P.I. Institution Name:Minnesota State University-Moorhead
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Department of Nursing, 1104 7th Avenue South, Moorhead, MN, 56563, USA
Contact Telephone:218.236.2695
Use of complementary and alternative therapies (CAM) continues to increase in the US and internationally. CAM use has been reported to be higher in those with chronic or debilitating disease. This study examined antecedents to CAM use and quality of life (QL) outcomes among both CAM users and nonusers in a lung transplant sample. CAM use was viewed as a coping method within the theory of stress, appraisal and coping (Lazarus and Folkman, 1984). Personal characteristics and transplantation status were antecedents. Illness intrusion and symptom distress were primary appraisals. Five QL and health related quality of life (HRQL) outcomes were included. A mailed survey to lung transplant recipients (n=99) and candidates (n=67) included measures of complementary therapies use, proposed antecedent variables, symptom burden and QL/HRQL outcomes. Predictors of CAM use among the total group were analyzed by logistic regression. The impact of personal characteristics or coping methods (specifically, CAM use) on the QL or HRQL outcomes was examined by hierarchical regression. CAMs were used by 90% of respondents. When prayer and support groups were excluded, CAMs were utilized by 65.7% of recipients and 83.6% of candidates; significantly more than the general public. Significant antecedents included being female, with slightly higher education and less positive affect. Antecedents and mediating variables explained between 45% and 65% of the variance for the QL/HRQL outcomes. Overall QL and physical HRQL outcomes differed significantly between candidates and recipients, while mental HRQL outcomes did not differ either between groups or between the sample and the general public. CAM use was not significant in any outcomes. Current models do not adequately explain either the differences between mental and physical health outcomes or the role of personal characteristics, including affect, in QL/ HRQL outcomes or CAM use.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComplementary Therapies Use: Antecedents and Quality of Life Outcomesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161634-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Complementary Therapies Use: Antecedents and Quality of Life Outcomes</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Matthees, Barbara</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Minnesota State University-Moorhead</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Department of Nursing, 1104 7th Avenue South, Moorhead, MN, 56563, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">218.236.2695</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">matthees@mnstate.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Use of complementary and alternative therapies (CAM) continues to increase in the US and internationally. CAM use has been reported to be higher in those with chronic or debilitating disease. This study examined antecedents to CAM use and quality of life (QL) outcomes among both CAM users and nonusers in a lung transplant sample. CAM use was viewed as a coping method within the theory of stress, appraisal and coping (Lazarus and Folkman, 1984). Personal characteristics and transplantation status were antecedents. Illness intrusion and symptom distress were primary appraisals. Five QL and health related quality of life (HRQL) outcomes were included. A mailed survey to lung transplant recipients (n=99) and candidates (n=67) included measures of complementary therapies use, proposed antecedent variables, symptom burden and QL/HRQL outcomes. Predictors of CAM use among the total group were analyzed by logistic regression. The impact of personal characteristics or coping methods (specifically, CAM use) on the QL or HRQL outcomes was examined by hierarchical regression. CAMs were used by 90% of respondents. When prayer and support groups were excluded, CAMs were utilized by 65.7% of recipients and 83.6% of candidates; significantly more than the general public. Significant antecedents included being female, with slightly higher education and less positive affect. Antecedents and mediating variables explained between 45% and 65% of the variance for the QL/HRQL outcomes. Overall QL and physical HRQL outcomes differed significantly between candidates and recipients, while mental HRQL outcomes did not differ either between groups or between the sample and the general public. CAM use was not significant in any outcomes. Current models do not adequately explain either the differences between mental and physical health outcomes or the role of personal characteristics, including affect, in QL/ HRQL outcomes or CAM use.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:38Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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