Cultural Diversity and Breast Cancer Screening among Women of Chinese Descent Residing in an Urban County, Michigan

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161635
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural Diversity and Breast Cancer Screening among Women of Chinese Descent Residing in an Urban County, Michigan
Abstract:
Cultural Diversity and Breast Cancer Screening among Women of Chinese Descent Residing in an Urban County, Michigan
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Yu, Mei-yu, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Title:Associate Research Scientist
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, Rm 2238, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.936.3590
Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer for Chinese American women in the US, but Chinese women are reluctant to make visits for routine cancer screening. Multiple factors, including cultural beliefs/attitudes, influence women's cancer screening behavior. However, appropriate research instruments to measure the association between women's cultural beliefs and their cancer screening behaviors are lacking. This study modifies Mood's (1996) Strength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (SCAS) to measure the extent to which persons share behaviors and beliefs with their self-identified cultural group, assesses the instrument's reliability and validity, and explores strength of cultural affiliation among subgroups of Chinese descent (e.g., Chinese, Taiwanese, Chinese Americans). The instrument was first revised in English, translated into Chinese, validated through back translation, and pilot tested. The survey was conducted in an urban county of Michigan. The strength of cultural affiliation was measured by a 15-item self administered tool. The preliminary analysis based on a data set of 108 women of Chinese descent showed an internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) of .84. Those who identified themselves as Chinese Americans had significantly less (p=.007) strength of affiliation with Chinese culture than those who identified themselves as Chinese. Our data indicated significant correlations between cultural affiliation, socio/demographic variables and women's mammogram use. More specifically, women who had a stronger affiliation with Chinese culture were less likely to have a mammogram in the past two years (r=-.255, p=.008); but more likely to be newer immigrants with poorer ability to speak English and feel more stressed when visiting English-speaking health services (r=-.482 to -.325, p=.000 to.001). The strength of cultural affiliation needs to be considered to better understand Chinese American women's breast cancer screening behavior, so that the culturally appropriate cancer screening promotion programs can be designed and implemented. (Funded by NCI grant #1R03CA86594-01.)
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural Diversity and Breast Cancer Screening among Women of Chinese Descent Residing in an Urban County, Michiganen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161635-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural Diversity and Breast Cancer Screening among Women of Chinese Descent Residing in an Urban County, Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Yu, Mei-yu, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Research Scientist</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls Building, Rm 2238, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.936.3590</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">yujiang@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer for Chinese American women in the US, but Chinese women are reluctant to make visits for routine cancer screening. Multiple factors, including cultural beliefs/attitudes, influence women's cancer screening behavior. However, appropriate research instruments to measure the association between women's cultural beliefs and their cancer screening behaviors are lacking. This study modifies Mood's (1996) Strength of Cultural Affiliation Scale (SCAS) to measure the extent to which persons share behaviors and beliefs with their self-identified cultural group, assesses the instrument's reliability and validity, and explores strength of cultural affiliation among subgroups of Chinese descent (e.g., Chinese, Taiwanese, Chinese Americans). The instrument was first revised in English, translated into Chinese, validated through back translation, and pilot tested. The survey was conducted in an urban county of Michigan. The strength of cultural affiliation was measured by a 15-item self administered tool. The preliminary analysis based on a data set of 108 women of Chinese descent showed an internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha) of .84. Those who identified themselves as Chinese Americans had significantly less (p=.007) strength of affiliation with Chinese culture than those who identified themselves as Chinese. Our data indicated significant correlations between cultural affiliation, socio/demographic variables and women's mammogram use. More specifically, women who had a stronger affiliation with Chinese culture were less likely to have a mammogram in the past two years (r=-.255, p=.008); but more likely to be newer immigrants with poorer ability to speak English and feel more stressed when visiting English-speaking health services (r=-.482 to -.325, p=.000 to.001). The strength of cultural affiliation needs to be considered to better understand Chinese American women's breast cancer screening behavior, so that the culturally appropriate cancer screening promotion programs can be designed and implemented. (Funded by NCI grant #1R03CA86594-01.)</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:39Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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