2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161639
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Effect of Pain Education on Postoperative Pain Management
Abstract:
Effect of Pain Education on Postoperative Pain Management
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Watkins, Gwendolyn, MS
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:3129967900
This study, guided by Orem's self-care model of nursing, compared the effect of two education interventions on knowledge, pain management (use of pain relieving interventions), and pain intensity using a 2-group pretest-posttest study design with random assignment to control or experimental group. The sample included 79 adult surgical outpatients discharged less than 24 hours following an open or laparoscopic abdominal or inguinal procedure performed under general anesthesia. Control group subjects received minimal general information related to taking/receiving pain medication "as needed" (routine pain education); experimental group subjects received specific information about patient-related barriers to pain management and the effective use of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain relieving interventions (routine pain education plus booklet). Pretest data collection occurred before surgery at the time of preoperative testing; posttest data collection occurred by telephone on postoperative days one, four, and seven. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to evaluate differences between education group, time, and interaction between group and time. At pretest, the control and experimental groups were similar on all variables. From pretest to postoperative day one, the experimental group experienced a greater increase in pain management knowledge than the control group with the increase in knowledge for both groups remaining stable through postoperative day seven. However, there was no significant difference between control and experimental groups on postoperative days one, four, or seven in the use of pain relieving interventions (pharmacological and non-pharmacological), pain intensity, or pain interference with daily activities. Pain management education facilitated an increase in knowledge but did not result in an increase in the use of pain relieving interventions. Education alone may be insufficient to change behavior; development of more powerful interventions to facilitate an increase in the use of pain relieving interventions by surgical outpatients are needed.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleEffect of Pain Education on Postoperative Pain Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161639-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Effect of Pain Education on Postoperative Pain Management</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Watkins, Gwendolyn, MS</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">3129967900</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">gwatki1@vic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">This study, guided by Orem's self-care model of nursing, compared the effect of two education interventions on knowledge, pain management (use of pain relieving interventions), and pain intensity using a 2-group pretest-posttest study design with random assignment to control or experimental group. The sample included 79 adult surgical outpatients discharged less than 24 hours following an open or laparoscopic abdominal or inguinal procedure performed under general anesthesia. Control group subjects received minimal general information related to taking/receiving pain medication &quot;as needed&quot; (routine pain education); experimental group subjects received specific information about patient-related barriers to pain management and the effective use of both pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain relieving interventions (routine pain education plus booklet). Pretest data collection occurred before surgery at the time of preoperative testing; posttest data collection occurred by telephone on postoperative days one, four, and seven. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to evaluate differences between education group, time, and interaction between group and time. At pretest, the control and experimental groups were similar on all variables. From pretest to postoperative day one, the experimental group experienced a greater increase in pain management knowledge than the control group with the increase in knowledge for both groups remaining stable through postoperative day seven. However, there was no significant difference between control and experimental groups on postoperative days one, four, or seven in the use of pain relieving interventions (pharmacological and non-pharmacological), pain intensity, or pain interference with daily activities. Pain management education facilitated an increase in knowledge but did not result in an increase in the use of pain relieving interventions. Education alone may be insufficient to change behavior; development of more powerful interventions to facilitate an increase in the use of pain relieving interventions by surgical outpatients are needed.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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