2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161640
Type:
Presentation
Title:
HIV Disease: Perceived Stress, Mood, and Functional Health in the Era of Haart
Abstract:
HIV Disease: Perceived Stress, Mood, and Functional Health in the Era of Haart
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Robinson, F.
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Research Associate
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 405E NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.8217
The management of HIV disease with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses viral load. Yet, despite HAART treatment, those living with HIV infection continue to face a multitude of psychosocial and physical stressors related to HIV and its therapy. Stress perception leads to behavioral and neuroendocrine responses that may negatively impact functional health. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate relationships among psychological stress, mood state, and functional health in HIV-infected men. A convenience sample of HIV infected men maintained on HAART (N=56) was enrolled. The participants were mostly gay, white, college-educated men, with a mean age of 40 years and an HIV+ diagnosis for 9 years. Participants reported low viral loads, which were confirmed in a subgroup of the men. A descriptive correlational design was employed in which psychometric instruments were administered at enrollment. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) was used to measure stress, while mood state was measured using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). The Functional Assessment of HIV Infection (FAHI) was administered to reflect functional health. Mean PSS and POMS scores were greater than that reported for age-matched controls. Significant inverse relationships were found between the FAHI total scale and the POMS total mood score (p<0.001). Similarly, a significant inverse relationship was found between the FAHI and the PSS (p<0.001). On the other hand, a significant direct relationship ( p<0.001) was found between the PSS and mood disturbance. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that men living with HIV in the era of HAART continue to report increased stress and mood disturbance, which is associated with poorer functional health. The discipline of nursing is well poised to develop biobehavioral stress management programs, which may, in turn, improve functional health for those living with HIV disease.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHIV Disease: Perceived Stress, Mood, and Functional Health in the Era of Haarten_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161640-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">HIV Disease: Perceived Stress, Mood, and Functional Health in the Era of Haart</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Robinson, F.</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Research Associate</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 405E NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.8217</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">prphd@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The management of HIV disease with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) suppresses viral load. Yet, despite HAART treatment, those living with HIV infection continue to face a multitude of psychosocial and physical stressors related to HIV and its therapy. Stress perception leads to behavioral and neuroendocrine responses that may negatively impact functional health. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate relationships among psychological stress, mood state, and functional health in HIV-infected men. A convenience sample of HIV infected men maintained on HAART (N=56) was enrolled. The participants were mostly gay, white, college-educated men, with a mean age of 40 years and an HIV+ diagnosis for 9 years. Participants reported low viral loads, which were confirmed in a subgroup of the men. A descriptive correlational design was employed in which psychometric instruments were administered at enrollment. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) was used to measure stress, while mood state was measured using the Profile of Mood States (POMS). The Functional Assessment of HIV Infection (FAHI) was administered to reflect functional health. Mean PSS and POMS scores were greater than that reported for age-matched controls. Significant inverse relationships were found between the FAHI total scale and the POMS total mood score (p&lt;0.001). Similarly, a significant inverse relationship was found between the FAHI and the PSS (p&lt;0.001). On the other hand, a significant direct relationship ( p&lt;0.001) was found between the PSS and mood disturbance. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that men living with HIV in the era of HAART continue to report increased stress and mood disturbance, which is associated with poorer functional health. The discipline of nursing is well poised to develop biobehavioral stress management programs, which may, in turn, improve functional health for those living with HIV disease.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:43Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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