2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161642
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Inspiratory Muscle Strength in COPD: Two-Year Follow-up
Abstract:
Inspiratory Muscle Strength in COPD: Two-Year Follow-up
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2002
Author:Larson, Janet, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois at Chicago
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 706 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
Contact Telephone:312.996.7955
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by a decline in functional strength of the inspiratory muscles and substantial evidence suggests that the decline in inspiratory muscle strength contributes to the development of dyspnea, the most distressing symptom of COPD. The rate of decline and underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This longitudinal study was designed to track the decline and to simultaneously document changes in variables thought to influence inspiratory muscle strength. A better understanding of this phenomena could lead to interventions to minimize loss of inspiratory muscle strength and the associated dyspnea. We studied elderly people with moderate to severe COPD, excluding those with very severe COPD. We followed 49 subjects yearly for two years and measured: inspiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax)), hyperinflation of the chest (residual volume/total lung capacity (RV/TLC)), peripheral muscle strength (handgrip strength, isokinetic strength of knee flexors and extensors), lean body mass (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry). The forced expiratory volume in one second was 47 (16) % predicted normal values (mean(SD)). The PImax was stable over the two years, 81(26) and 86(24)-cmH2O (p=.0006). There was no change in hyperinflation, RV/TLC .57(.09) and .57(.09); a small decrease in lean body mass, 51(11) to 49 (11)kg (p=.0056); a small increase in peripheral muscle strength 83(14)and 86(15)% predicted normal value (p=.0023). The changes in PImax, lean body mass and peripheral muscle strength were not clinically meaningful. The results suggest that inspiratory muscle strength is stable during the moderate and severe stages of COPD and the decline occurs at a later phase, possibly when the disease reaches very severe stages. Hence it may be appropriate to delay laborious nutritional and inspiratory muscle training interventions until the later stages of COPD, thereby reducing treatment burden without compromising outcomes. Further longitudinal follow-up is warranted to fully describe changes over time.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleInspiratory Muscle Strength in COPD: Two-Year Follow-upen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161642-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Inspiratory Muscle Strength in COPD: Two-Year Follow-up</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2002</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Larson, Janet, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois at Chicago</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 845 South Damen Avenue, M/C 802, 706 NURS, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.996.7955</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">jllarson@uic.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by a decline in functional strength of the inspiratory muscles and substantial evidence suggests that the decline in inspiratory muscle strength contributes to the development of dyspnea, the most distressing symptom of COPD. The rate of decline and underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This longitudinal study was designed to track the decline and to simultaneously document changes in variables thought to influence inspiratory muscle strength. A better understanding of this phenomena could lead to interventions to minimize loss of inspiratory muscle strength and the associated dyspnea. We studied elderly people with moderate to severe COPD, excluding those with very severe COPD. We followed 49 subjects yearly for two years and measured: inspiratory muscle strength (maximal inspiratory pressure (PImax)), hyperinflation of the chest (residual volume/total lung capacity (RV/TLC)), peripheral muscle strength (handgrip strength, isokinetic strength of knee flexors and extensors), lean body mass (dual energy x-ray absorptiometry). The forced expiratory volume in one second was 47 (16) % predicted normal values (mean(SD)). The PImax was stable over the two years, 81(26) and 86(24)-cmH2O (p=.0006). There was no change in hyperinflation, RV/TLC .57(.09) and .57(.09); a small decrease in lean body mass, 51(11) to 49 (11)kg (p=.0056); a small increase in peripheral muscle strength 83(14)and 86(15)% predicted normal value (p=.0023). The changes in PImax, lean body mass and peripheral muscle strength were not clinically meaningful. The results suggest that inspiratory muscle strength is stable during the moderate and severe stages of COPD and the decline occurs at a later phase, possibly when the disease reaches very severe stages. Hence it may be appropriate to delay laborious nutritional and inspiratory muscle training interventions until the later stages of COPD, thereby reducing treatment burden without compromising outcomes. Further longitudinal follow-up is warranted to fully describe changes over time.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:45Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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