2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161644
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Correlates of maternal depression during toddlerhood
Abstract:
Correlates of maternal depression during toddlerhood
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Gross, Deborah, DNS/DNSc/DSN
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA
Contact Telephone:312.942.6201
It has been theorized that the high rate of depression among mothers of young children results from the chronic stress mothers experience managing the family's needs under difficult conditions (Brown and Harris, 1975). This longitudinal study examines the relationships among maternal depression and the perceived quality of the caregiving environment throughout toddlerhood (1-3 years). Mothers (n=l59) completed the CESD depression scale, the Toddler Temperament Scale, a measure of maternal confidence (TCQ) and the Motherhood Self-Evaluation Questionnaire (measuring perceived marital quality, life circumstances, and support from friends/family). The sample consists of working-class mothers, (75% minority). Results of a stepwise regression at T sub 1, suggest that depressed mothers have poorer marriages (beta=-.31), are dissatisfied with their life circumstances (beta=-.24), have less support from friends/family (beta=-.20), and have less confidence about their parenting (beta=-.17). The data suggest that mothers with inadequate resources for creating a healthy environment for their toddlers are most at risk for depression. Data will be analyzed to examine how these factors covary over time.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCorrelates of maternal depression during toddlerhooden_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161644-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Correlates of maternal depression during toddlerhood</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Gross, Deborah, DNS/DNSc/DSN</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.942.6201</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">It has been theorized that the high rate of depression among mothers of young children results from the chronic stress mothers experience managing the family's needs under difficult conditions (Brown and Harris, 1975). This longitudinal study examines the relationships among maternal depression and the perceived quality of the caregiving environment throughout toddlerhood (1-3 years). Mothers (n=l59) completed the CESD depression scale, the Toddler Temperament Scale, a measure of maternal confidence (TCQ) and the Motherhood Self-Evaluation Questionnaire (measuring perceived marital quality, life circumstances, and support from friends/family). The sample consists of working-class mothers, (75% minority). Results of a stepwise regression at T sub 1, suggest that depressed mothers have poorer marriages (beta=-.31), are dissatisfied with their life circumstances (beta=-.24), have less support from friends/family (beta=-.20), and have less confidence about their parenting (beta=-.17). The data suggest that mothers with inadequate resources for creating a healthy environment for their toddlers are most at risk for depression. Data will be analyzed to examine how these factors covary over time.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:47Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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