2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161646
Type:
Presentation
Title:
An abbreviated instrument to measure hope
Abstract:
An abbreviated instrument to measure hope
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Herth, Kaye, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Georgia Southern University, Department of Nursing
Title:Professor/Chair
Contact Address:Landrum Box 8158, Statesboro, GA, 30480-8158, USA
Contact Telephone:912.681.5455
The purpose of this study was the development and psychometric evaluation of an abbreviated instrument to measure hope in adults. The 12-item abbreviated hope, entitled the Hope Index (HHI) was completed by 2O hospitalized medical-surgical patients, 175 well adults, and 172 acute, chronic, and terminally ill adults from various clinical agencies (hospitals, hospices, homecare). The alpha reliability coefficients for the total scale ranged from .89 to .97 with a 2 week test-retest reliability of .87 to .91. Criterion-related validity was established by correlating the HHI with the original Hope Scale (r=.92), the Existential Well-Being Scale (r=.84), and the Nowotny Hope Scale (r=.8l). Divergent validity with the Hopelessness scale was established (r=-.73). The multidimensionality of the construct was supported through the factorial isolation of three factors: Temporality and future, Positive readiness and expectancy, and interconnectedness. The HHI could serve as a clinical research tool to measure hope, as a useful diagnostic aid in planning strategies to assist clients in maintaining, regaining, or supporting hope; and as a tool to evaluate the effectiveness of hope-enhancing strategies implemented by the nurse.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAn abbreviated instrument to measure hopeen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161646-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">An abbreviated instrument to measure hope</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Herth, Kaye, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Georgia Southern University, Department of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor/Chair</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Landrum Box 8158, Statesboro, GA, 30480-8158, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">912.681.5455</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">kherth@gsvms2.cc.gasou.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was the development and psychometric evaluation of an abbreviated instrument to measure hope in adults. The 12-item abbreviated hope, entitled the Hope Index (HHI) was completed by 2O hospitalized medical-surgical patients, 175 well adults, and 172 acute, chronic, and terminally ill adults from various clinical agencies (hospitals, hospices, homecare). The alpha reliability coefficients for the total scale ranged from .89 to .97 with a 2 week test-retest reliability of .87 to .91. Criterion-related validity was established by correlating the HHI with the original Hope Scale (r=.92), the Existential Well-Being Scale (r=.84), and the Nowotny Hope Scale (r=.8l). Divergent validity with the Hopelessness scale was established (r=-.73). The multidimensionality of the construct was supported through the factorial isolation of three factors: Temporality and future, Positive readiness and expectancy, and interconnectedness. The HHI could serve as a clinical research tool to measure hope, as a useful diagnostic aid in planning strategies to assist clients in maintaining, regaining, or supporting hope; and as a tool to evaluate the effectiveness of hope-enhancing strategies implemented by the nurse.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:49Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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