2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161647
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Cultural manifestation of the response to pain
Abstract:
Cultural manifestation of the response to pain
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Atcheson, Evelyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Oklahoma
Title:Lecturer
Contact Address:1100 N. Stonewall PO Box 26901, Oklahoma City, OK, 73190, USA
Contact Telephone:405.271.2420
Pain is a universal phenomenon which has transcended time, place

and person. Early researchers demonstrated that the pain

threshold was similar among different races of people, but their

response to that pain varied. This descriptive study was

conducted to learn how nurses representing four different

cultural groups express and manage their own pain. The sample

consisted of 47 Korean nurses, 50 Taiwanese nurses, 60 American

nurses, and 50 Mexican nurses (207 total) who were very similar

in age and other demographic variables. The Personal Response to

Pain Inventory âPRPIÕ developed by this author was translated

into four languages.



The Korean nurses demonstrated a statistically significant

difference in stoic score when compared to the other three

groups (F=22.99, p= .000). This group reported taking the

strongest pain relief medication possible, as soon as possible,

and also reported wanting their family around during the ordeal.

Other studies have correlated nurses' own report of pain behavior

to nursing interventions for clients in pain, and found a strong

relationship. If this is true, then the implications for

studying nurses' report of behavior during pain could be used as

a predictor for nursing interventions. Further studies are

needed to learn more about this phenomenon and the implications

for pain management.



Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCultural manifestation of the response to painen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161647-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Cultural manifestation of the response to pain</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Atcheson, Evelyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Oklahoma</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Lecturer</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">1100 N. Stonewall PO Box 26901, Oklahoma City, OK, 73190, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">405.271.2420</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">eacheson@swbell.net</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Pain is a universal phenomenon which has transcended time, place<br/><br/>and person. Early researchers demonstrated that the pain<br/><br/>threshold was similar among different races of people, but their<br/><br/>response to that pain varied. This descriptive study was<br/><br/>conducted to learn how nurses representing four different<br/><br/>cultural groups express and manage their own pain. The sample<br/><br/>consisted of 47 Korean nurses, 50 Taiwanese nurses, 60 American<br/><br/>nurses, and 50 Mexican nurses (207 total) who were very similar<br/><br/>in age and other demographic variables. The Personal Response to<br/><br/>Pain Inventory &acirc;PRPI&Otilde; developed by this author was translated<br/><br/>into four languages.<br/><br/><br/><br/>The Korean nurses demonstrated a statistically significant<br/><br/>difference in stoic score when compared to the other three<br/><br/>groups (F=22.99, p= .000). This group reported taking the<br/><br/>strongest pain relief medication possible, as soon as possible,<br/><br/>and also reported wanting their family around during the ordeal.<br/><br/>Other studies have correlated nurses' own report of pain behavior<br/><br/>to nursing interventions for clients in pain, and found a strong<br/><br/>relationship. If this is true, then the implications for<br/><br/>studying nurses' report of behavior during pain could be used as<br/><br/>a predictor for nursing interventions. Further studies are<br/><br/>needed to learn more about this phenomenon and the implications<br/><br/>for pain management.<br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:50Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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