2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161649
Type:
Presentation
Title:
World views in dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy: Ethics in human research
Abstract:
World views in dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy: Ethics in human research
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Miya, Pamela, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:600 S. 42nd St., Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA
Contact Telephone:402.559.6564
World views influence ethical conduct of human research by affecting ethical systems and defining behaviors. World views function normatively in determining identification of the ethical issues and importance of the ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice in human research. Doctorally-prepared faculty (N = 264/discipline) were randomly mailed a 59-item survey utilizing a Likert scale that (a) assessed three world views, (b) identified ethical issues, and (c) determined importance of ethical principles. Cronbach's alpha was .82 for the instrument. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Response rates ranged from 33-52 percent; no bias was present (alpha = .01). Results supported biological-technical and psychological-sociological world views for dentistry and nursing respectively. Pharmacists held a psychological-sociological view rather than the biochemical view theorized. Autonomy had the highest mean value as an identified ethical issue; beneficence/nonmaleficence and justice followed. The principle of beneficence/nonmaleficence was most important in dentistry and autonomy was most important in nursing and pharmacy. Multiple regressions found no significant relationship between world views and (a) identification of ethical issues and (b) importance of ethical principles (alpha - .003). Implications are evident for IRBs; by insuring autonomy, researchers may believe they assure beneficent/nonmaleficent and just treatment.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorld views in dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy: Ethics in human researchen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161649-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">World views in dentistry, nursing, and pharmacy: Ethics in human research</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Miya, Pamela, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Nebraska Medical Center, College of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">600 S. 42nd St., Omaha, NE, 68198-5330, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">402.559.6564</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">pmiya@unmc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">World views influence ethical conduct of human research by affecting ethical systems and defining behaviors. World views function normatively in determining identification of the ethical issues and importance of the ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence/nonmaleficence, and justice in human research. Doctorally-prepared faculty (N = 264/discipline) were randomly mailed a 59-item survey utilizing a Likert scale that (a) assessed three world views, (b) identified ethical issues, and (c) determined importance of ethical principles. Cronbach's alpha was .82 for the instrument. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Response rates ranged from 33-52 percent; no bias was present (alpha = .01). Results supported biological-technical and psychological-sociological world views for dentistry and nursing respectively. Pharmacists held a psychological-sociological view rather than the biochemical view theorized. Autonomy had the highest mean value as an identified ethical issue; beneficence/nonmaleficence and justice followed. The principle of beneficence/nonmaleficence was most important in dentistry and autonomy was most important in nursing and pharmacy. Multiple regressions found no significant relationship between world views and (a) identification of ethical issues and (b) importance of ethical principles (alpha - .003). Implications are evident for IRBs; by insuring autonomy, researchers may believe they assure beneficent/nonmaleficent and just treatment.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:24:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:24:52Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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