2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161663
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Circulatory response following coronary artery bypass grafting
Abstract:
Circulatory response following coronary artery bypass grafting
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1991
Author:Sommers, Marilyn, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Cincinnati
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 249 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA
Contact Telephone:513.558.5268
More than 800,000 pulmonary artery (PA) catheters are used each year in America to monitor thermodilution cardiac output and cardiac index (CI). PA catheterization exposes critically ill individuals to significant iatrogenesis, whereas noninvasive indicators of CI may limit complications. The purpose of this study was to identify the concurrent validity of two noninvasive, indirect measures of CI (skin temperature and limb blood flow LBF by determining their correlation with direct, invasive measures. The study also identified the correlation between CI and selected clinical and laboratory indicators used to estimate CI indirectly. Twenty-one subjects were studied at five data collection times in the first 8 hours following coronary artery bypass grafting. Axillary temperature and LBF had moderate correlations with CI at Time 0 (r = .43 to .53; p = .01 to .05); ankle temperature had moderate correlation with CI at Time 2 (r = .44; p = .046). Significant correlations (p < .05) between CI and SvO2 were found only at Times 3 (r = .66) and 4 (r = .44). Secondary analysis determined that in subjects without lung disease, the PvO2 had significant correlation with CI at all data collection times (r = .54 to .72; p = .003 to .02). These results indicate that selected noninvasive measures may reliably predict CI. One invasive indicator, PvO2, showed promise as a predictor for CI.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCirculatory response following coronary artery bypass graftingen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161663-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Circulatory response following coronary artery bypass grafting</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1991</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Sommers, Marilyn, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Cincinnati</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 249 Procter Hall, PO Box 670038, Cincinnati, OH, 45267-0038, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">513.558.5268</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lynn.sommers@uc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">More than 800,000 pulmonary artery (PA) catheters are used each year in America to monitor thermodilution cardiac output and cardiac index (CI). PA catheterization exposes critically ill individuals to significant iatrogenesis, whereas noninvasive indicators of CI may limit complications. The purpose of this study was to identify the concurrent validity of two noninvasive, indirect measures of CI (skin temperature and limb blood flow LBF by determining their correlation with direct, invasive measures. The study also identified the correlation between CI and selected clinical and laboratory indicators used to estimate CI indirectly. Twenty-one subjects were studied at five data collection times in the first 8 hours following coronary artery bypass grafting. Axillary temperature and LBF had moderate correlations with CI at Time 0 (r = .43 to .53; p = .01 to .05); ankle temperature had moderate correlation with CI at Time 2 (r = .44; p = .046). Significant correlations (p &lt; .05) between CI and SvO2 were found only at Times 3 (r = .66) and 4 (r = .44). Secondary analysis determined that in subjects without lung disease, the PvO2 had significant correlation with CI at all data collection times (r = .54 to .72; p = .003 to .02). These results indicate that selected noninvasive measures may reliably predict CI. One invasive indicator, PvO2, showed promise as a predictor for CI.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:07Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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