2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161667
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Women's Decision Making About Breast Cancer Prevention and Detection
Abstract:
Women's Decision Making About Breast Cancer Prevention and Detection
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:1995
Conference Date:April 1 - 3, 1995
Author:Lewis, Marsha, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota School of Nursing
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:WDH 6-101 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612.624.7694
Health professionals have an obligation to understand women's decision making about mammography and to advocate for their active participation in health care decision making. While mammography is a major screening measure for the second largest cancer killer of women, only about half of women over age 50, and fewer over 70, undergo mammography in accordance with American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify women's overall decision-making approaches when considering mammography. Subjects were a purposive, convenience sample of 50 women in the community who had made a decision about mammography; they included those who chose to have mammograms according to the pre-1997 ACS guidelines. Subjects participated in audio-taped interviews. Results indicated that women approached the mammography decision differently regardless of the decision they made. Three overall decision-making approaches to addressing risk factors, issues about mammography, or other factors prior to their decision were evident. The approaches were 1) thoughtful consideration; 2) cursory consideration; and 3) little or no consideration. Each approach has implications for nurses who assist women in making decisions about mammography.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
1-Apr-1995
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWomen's Decision Making About Breast Cancer Prevention and Detectionen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161667-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Women's Decision Making About Breast Cancer Prevention and Detection</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">1995</td></tr><tr class="item-conference-date"><td class="label">Conference Date:</td><td class="value">April 1 - 3, 1995</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Lewis, Marsha, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">WDH 6-101 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612.624.7694</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">lewis003@tc.umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Health professionals have an obligation to understand women's decision making about mammography and to advocate for their active participation in health care decision making. While mammography is a major screening measure for the second largest cancer killer of women, only about half of women over age 50, and fewer over 70, undergo mammography in accordance with American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to identify women's overall decision-making approaches when considering mammography. Subjects were a purposive, convenience sample of 50 women in the community who had made a decision about mammography; they included those who chose to have mammograms according to the pre-1997 ACS guidelines. Subjects participated in audio-taped interviews. Results indicated that women approached the mammography decision differently regardless of the decision they made. Three overall decision-making approaches to addressing risk factors, issues about mammography, or other factors prior to their decision were evident. The approaches were 1) thoughtful consideration; 2) cursory consideration; and 3) little or no consideration. Each approach has implications for nurses who assist women in making decisions about mammography. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:12Z-
dc.date.issued1995-04-01en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:12Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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