Assessment of depression and associated risk factors in newly admitted residents of assisted living facilities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161673
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessment of depression and associated risk factors in newly admitted residents of assisted living facilities
Abstract:
Assessment of depression and associated risk factors in newly admitted residents of assisted living facilities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Kaas, Merrie
P.I. Institution Name:Univ. of Minnesota School of Nursing
Contact Address:6-101 WDH, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:6126255000
Assisted living facilities (ALFs) are fast becoming the intermediate residential care setting between independent home living and nursing home residency. Because of relocation stress, increasing physical and mental frailty, and changes in life style, newly admitted residents to ALFs may be at risk for depression. The purpose of this research is to assess for depression and associated risk factors in newly admitted ALF residents at time of admission, 3 months and 6 months after admission. Subjects were interviewed in their new ALF homes regarding the decision to move to the ALF, the strategies they use to maintain their physical and mental health, mental status, physical symptoms, depressive symptoms, activities of daily living, and overall health status. This poster reports interview data on 20 subjects at the time of admission and the three month follow-up. The majority of subjects were cognitively intact, Caucasian, single women, with an average age of 81 and overall perceived health status of good to very good. Mean Geriatric Depression Scale scores indicated mild to moderate depression that remained from admission (mean = 5.56) to 3 month follow-up (mean = 5.50). Suggested associated risks for depression are control over admission decision and physical symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessment of depression and associated risk factors in newly admitted residents of assisted living facilitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161673-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Assessment of depression and associated risk factors in newly admitted residents of assisted living facilities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kaas, Merrie</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Univ. of Minnesota School of Nursing</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">6-101 WDH, 308 Harvard St. SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">6126255000</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Assisted living facilities (ALFs) are fast becoming the intermediate residential care setting between independent home living and nursing home residency. Because of relocation stress, increasing physical and mental frailty, and changes in life style, newly admitted residents to ALFs may be at risk for depression. The purpose of this research is to assess for depression and associated risk factors in newly admitted ALF residents at time of admission, 3 months and 6 months after admission. Subjects were interviewed in their new ALF homes regarding the decision to move to the ALF, the strategies they use to maintain their physical and mental health, mental status, physical symptoms, depressive symptoms, activities of daily living, and overall health status. This poster reports interview data on 20 subjects at the time of admission and the three month follow-up. The majority of subjects were cognitively intact, Caucasian, single women, with an average age of 81 and overall perceived health status of good to very good. Mean Geriatric Depression Scale scores indicated mild to moderate depression that remained from admission (mean = 5.56) to 3 month follow-up (mean = 5.50). Suggested associated risks for depression are control over admission decision and physical symptoms. </td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:18Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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