2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161676
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Grandmother caregivers: Stresses symptoms, and health promotion activities
Abstract:
Grandmother caregivers: Stresses symptoms, and health promotion activities
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2000
Author:Musil, Carol, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Case Western Reserve University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA
Contact Telephone:216.368.8775
Grandmother caregivers, including those with primary responsibility for raising grandchildren as well as grandmothers providing partial/supplemental care to grandchildren in multi-generational homes, often report ongoing stresses that may affect their health. There remains limited knowledge about the day-to-day stresses, health problems and health actions of grandmother caregivers, or whether these vary by grandmother caregiver status. This study examined stress and health activities of grandmother caregivers, comparing and contrasting these by primary v. supplemental caregiver status. Participants, a randomly selected sub-sample from a study of 174 grandmothers, had either primary (n=21) or partial/supplemental (n=19) caregiving responsibility for their grandchildren. Using a semi-structured diary format, participants recorded daily stresses, health problems, and health promotion activities over a consecutive three-week period. Content analysis was used to examine the diary data. Grandmothers in both groups reported substantial stresses, including concerns about grandchildren, family/relationship issues, and finances. Differences in stress generally reflected the degree of childrearing responsibility. Both groups reported similar health problems, including fatigue, headache, and sleep problems. Many participants reported physical exercise and prayer/religion as health promotion activities. Although differences in stresses related to caregiver status emerged, similarities between grandmothers suggest the need for interventions to women with caregiving responsibilities.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleGrandmother caregivers: Stresses symptoms, and health promotion activitiesen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161676-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Grandmother caregivers: Stresses symptoms, and health promotion activities</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2000</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Musil, Carol, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Case Western Reserve University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH, 44106-4904, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">216.368.8775</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cmm4@po.cwru.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Grandmother caregivers, including those with primary responsibility for raising grandchildren as well as grandmothers providing partial/supplemental care to grandchildren in multi-generational homes, often report ongoing stresses that may affect their health. There remains limited knowledge about the day-to-day stresses, health problems and health actions of grandmother caregivers, or whether these vary by grandmother caregiver status. This study examined stress and health activities of grandmother caregivers, comparing and contrasting these by primary v. supplemental caregiver status. Participants, a randomly selected sub-sample from a study of 174 grandmothers, had either primary (n=21) or partial/supplemental (n=19) caregiving responsibility for their grandchildren. Using a semi-structured diary format, participants recorded daily stresses, health problems, and health promotion activities over a consecutive three-week period. Content analysis was used to examine the diary data. Grandmothers in both groups reported substantial stresses, including concerns about grandchildren, family/relationship issues, and finances. Differences in stress generally reflected the degree of childrearing responsibility. Both groups reported similar health problems, including fatigue, headache, and sleep problems. Many participants reported physical exercise and prayer/religion as health promotion activities. Although differences in stresses related to caregiver status emerged, similarities between grandmothers suggest the need for interventions to women with caregiving responsibilities.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:21Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:21Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.