2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161680
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Exploring outcomes after critical illness in the elderly
Abstract:
Exploring outcomes after critical illness in the elderly
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Kleinpell, Ruth, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:Rush University
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA
Contact Telephone:312.942.2320
The purpose of this study was to determine the health status, functional status and discharge needs of patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting at 4 intervals: short term (1 month after discharge), moderate (3 and 6 months after discharge) and long term (12 months after discharge). A longitudinal prospective panel research design with the use of in-hospital and mailed questionnaires was used. Of 291 subjects approached to participate, 13 were not eligible, 27 died, 7 withdrew and 45 were dropped for nonresponse, leaving 199 participants. Subjects range in age from 45 to 86 (Mean=63, SD=10). Fifty-five percent are male (n=110) and 45% are female (n=89). Average hospital length of stay was 9 days (SD=6) and the average ICU length of stay was 3 days (SD=3). Severity of illness, as measured with the APACHE III rangd from 14 to 95 (Mean=48.3, SD=15). Functional status, as measured with the SF-36 did change over time, with physical functioning, social functioning and mental health subscale scores increasing over time while general health remained unchanged over time. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed no difference between subscale score changes over time between the 2 groups (p=.06 to .649). Health status, as measured with a perception of health rating scale increased from baseline to 6 months, then declined at the 1 year follow up. Middle aged subjects (age 45-64, n=72) were compared to elderly subjects (age 65 and older, n=127). Discharge planning was documented for 57% of subjects. However, documented discharge planning was not related to perceptions of discharge readiness (p=.795), concern about managing care at home (p=.426) or perceptions of being adequately prepared for discharge (p=.649). Phase II of the study, a randomized clinical trial of an early discharge planning intervention for critically ill elderly patients is currently being conducted.































Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleExploring outcomes after critical illness in the elderlyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161680-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Exploring outcomes after critical illness in the elderly</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Kleinpell, Ruth, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">Rush University</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 600 South Paulina, Suite 1080, Chicago, IL, 60612-3873, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">312.942.2320</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">rkleinpell@rushu.rush.du</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The purpose of this study was to determine the health status, functional status and discharge needs of patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit (ICU) setting at 4 intervals: short term (1 month after discharge), moderate (3 and 6 months after discharge) and long term (12 months after discharge). A longitudinal prospective panel research design with the use of in-hospital and mailed questionnaires was used. Of 291 subjects approached to participate, 13 were not eligible, 27 died, 7 withdrew and 45 were dropped for nonresponse, leaving 199 participants. Subjects range in age from 45 to 86 (Mean=63, SD=10). Fifty-five percent are male (n=110) and 45% are female (n=89). Average hospital length of stay was 9 days (SD=6) and the average ICU length of stay was 3 days (SD=3). Severity of illness, as measured with the APACHE III rangd from 14 to 95 (Mean=48.3, SD=15). Functional status, as measured with the SF-36 did change over time, with physical functioning, social functioning and mental health subscale scores increasing over time while general health remained unchanged over time. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed no difference between subscale score changes over time between the 2 groups (p=.06 to .649). Health status, as measured with a perception of health rating scale increased from baseline to 6 months, then declined at the 1 year follow up. Middle aged subjects (age 45-64, n=72) were compared to elderly subjects (age 65 and older, n=127). Discharge planning was documented for 57% of subjects. However, documented discharge planning was not related to perceptions of discharge readiness (p=.795), concern about managing care at home (p=.426) or perceptions of being adequately prepared for discharge (p=.649). Phase II of the study, a randomized clinical trial of an early discharge planning intervention for critically ill elderly patients is currently being conducted.<br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/><br/></td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:25Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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