Motivational factors influencing the adoption of health promoting behaviors: A qualitative study

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161681
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Motivational factors influencing the adoption of health promoting behaviors: A qualitative study
Abstract:
Motivational factors influencing the adoption of health promoting behaviors: A qualitative study
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Wynd, Christine, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Akron
Title:Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 202B, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA
Contact Telephone:330.972.5164
Objective: General health promotion programs are receiving increasing emphasis for reducing costs of illness care, yet additional research is needed to investigate promising techniques for motivating adoption of healthier lifestyles. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals (N=193) who were motivated to adopt healthier behaviors.



Design: This study employed a qualitative, descriptive design.



Population: Adult health care personnel constituted the target population.



Variables Studied: Subjects responded to an open-ended, semi-structured item on the Health Motivation Assessment Inventory (McEwen, 1993) asking them to describe a situation where they were motivated to adopt healthier behaviors and provide rationale for this change.



Methods: Individual subjects item narratives were transcribed and subjected to content analysis as the qualitative method of choice. Individual transcripts were read and analyzed for emergent patterns that produced themes and subthemes regarding health behaviors, motivational factors, and successful behavioral adoption techniques. Themes were then identified and validated through the work of a second qualitative researcher.



Findings: Relevant themes identified health promoting behaviors of (1) exercise, (2) weight loss, (3) smoking cessation, (4) improved diet and nutrition, (5) overcoming fatigue, and (6) other healthy behaviors. Common subthemes examined motivating factors such as self-image enhancement, increasing health and well-being, decreasing risk observed in family histories, and role modelling for children.



Conclusions: The findings are similar to the leading health indicators identified through Healthy People 2010: exercise and physical activity, weight loss to prevent overweight and obesity, and smoking cessation to overcome tobacco use.



Clinical Implications: This study has implications for designing future successful health promotion programs based on information that is systematically collected, analyzed, and made relevant to the public.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMotivational factors influencing the adoption of health promoting behaviors: A qualitative studyen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161681-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Motivational factors influencing the adoption of health promoting behaviors: A qualitative study</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Wynd, Christine, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Akron</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 209 Carroll Street, MGH 202B, Akron, OH, 44325-3701, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">330.972.5164</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">cwynd@uakron.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Objective: General health promotion programs are receiving increasing emphasis for reducing costs of illness care, yet additional research is needed to investigate promising techniques for motivating adoption of healthier lifestyles. The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of individuals (N=193) who were motivated to adopt healthier behaviors.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Design: This study employed a qualitative, descriptive design.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Population: Adult health care personnel constituted the target population.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Variables Studied: Subjects responded to an open-ended, semi-structured item on the Health Motivation Assessment Inventory (McEwen, 1993) asking them to describe a situation where they were motivated to adopt healthier behaviors and provide rationale for this change.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Methods: Individual subjects item narratives were transcribed and subjected to content analysis as the qualitative method of choice. Individual transcripts were read and analyzed for emergent patterns that produced themes and subthemes regarding health behaviors, motivational factors, and successful behavioral adoption techniques. Themes were then identified and validated through the work of a second qualitative researcher.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Findings: Relevant themes identified health promoting behaviors of (1) exercise, (2) weight loss, (3) smoking cessation, (4) improved diet and nutrition, (5) overcoming fatigue, and (6) other healthy behaviors. Common subthemes examined motivating factors such as self-image enhancement, increasing health and well-being, decreasing risk observed in family histories, and role modelling for children.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Conclusions: The findings are similar to the leading health indicators identified through Healthy People 2010: exercise and physical activity, weight loss to prevent overweight and obesity, and smoking cessation to overcome tobacco use.<br/><br/><br/><br/>Clinical Implications: This study has implications for designing future successful health promotion programs based on information that is systematically collected, analyzed, and made relevant to the public.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:26Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.