2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161687
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health outcomes of a community-based program for incarcerated pregnant women
Abstract:
Health outcomes of a community-based program for incarcerated pregnant women
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Barkauskas, Violet
P.I. Institution Name:University of Michigan
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA
Contact Telephone:734.647.0143
Although prison conditions are improving, incarceration can be detrimental to maternal and infant health. An experimental, community-based program, focused on health promotion, was established for incarcerated pregnant women with short-term sentences. Infants resided with mothers after birth. Prenatal care, delivery, and postpartum services were provided by a nurse-midwifery service. Additionally, job training and drug rehabilitation were provided through the 4th postpartum month. Program participants were high-risk secondary to medical complications, substance abuse, and pre-incarceration lifestyles. Program participants' prenatal, delivery, postpartum, and neonatal health outcomes were compared to those of other incarcerated women in the same prison system but without access to the community-based services. Pregnancy outcomes for project and comparison incarcerated woman were similar to outcomes observed in general populations, and much more positive than would be expected given pre-existing health problems. Findings provide insights into the physical and behavioral risks in a pregnant prison population, and demonstrate that good outcomes can be obtained in a high-risk population when comprehensive, nurse-midwifery care is partnered with community-based and other services to meet a unique population's health care needs. Despite substantial positive outcomes, the study identified a number of mental health problems and other issues that require further study and intervention.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth outcomes of a community-based program for incarcerated pregnant womenen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161687-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Health outcomes of a community-based program for incarcerated pregnant women</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Barkauskas, Violet</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Michigan</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 400 North Ingalls, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-0482, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">734.647.0143</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">vhbarkas@umich.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Although prison conditions are improving, incarceration can be detrimental to maternal and infant health. An experimental, community-based program, focused on health promotion, was established for incarcerated pregnant women with short-term sentences. Infants resided with mothers after birth. Prenatal care, delivery, and postpartum services were provided by a nurse-midwifery service. Additionally, job training and drug rehabilitation were provided through the 4th postpartum month. Program participants were high-risk secondary to medical complications, substance abuse, and pre-incarceration lifestyles. Program participants' prenatal, delivery, postpartum, and neonatal health outcomes were compared to those of other incarcerated women in the same prison system but without access to the community-based services. Pregnancy outcomes for project and comparison incarcerated woman were similar to outcomes observed in general populations, and much more positive than would be expected given pre-existing health problems. Findings provide insights into the physical and behavioral risks in a pregnant prison population, and demonstrate that good outcomes can be obtained in a high-risk population when comprehensive, nurse-midwifery care is partnered with community-based and other services to meet a unique population's health care needs. Despite substantial positive outcomes, the study identified a number of mental health problems and other issues that require further study and intervention.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:33Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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