2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161694
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The influence of affect on coping with symptoms in chronic illness
Abstract:
The influence of affect on coping with symptoms in chronic illness
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Brauer, Donna, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Minnesota
Title:Assistant Professor
Contact Address:School of Nursing, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA
Contact Telephone:612.624.4428
The influence of cognitive processes on coping with chronic disease has been widely studied, but less is known about the influence of affect. Because affective dispositions are stable and strongly associated with various emotional states, they may influence perceptions and behavioral preferences. Additional knowledge of affect's influence on coping would have significant value for understanding the process over time. This study's purpose, then, was to identify the effects of affective dispositions (positive emotionality, negative emotionality & constraint), disease duration, and symptom interpretation (seriousness, severity, controllability and cause) on coping behaviors. The theoretical basis was Leventhal's Self-regulation Model. The longitudinal design used questionnaires and a diary to assess affective dispositions and record daily symptoms, symptom interpretations and behavioral responses over a 3-week period. A sequential sample of 180 adults with a chronic rheumatic condition was recruited from two rheumatology clinics. Data analyses, consisting of descriptive statistics and polychotomous logistic regression are currently being conducted. Negative emotionality is hypothesized to be associated with threatening symptom interpretations, with passive coping and with persistent use of ineffective strategies. Positive emotionality is hypothesized to be associated with problem-focused strategy use and social support. Contraint is hypothesized to be associated with a narrow range of coping strategies.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe influence of affect on coping with symptoms in chronic illnessen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161694-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">The influence of affect on coping with symptoms in chronic illness</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Brauer, Donna, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Minnesota</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Assistant Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">School of Nursing, 6-101 Weaver-Densford Hall, 308 Harvard Street SE, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">612.624.4428</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">braue002@tc.umn.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">The influence of cognitive processes on coping with chronic disease has been widely studied, but less is known about the influence of affect. Because affective dispositions are stable and strongly associated with various emotional states, they may influence perceptions and behavioral preferences. Additional knowledge of affect's influence on coping would have significant value for understanding the process over time. This study's purpose, then, was to identify the effects of affective dispositions (positive emotionality, negative emotionality &amp; constraint), disease duration, and symptom interpretation (seriousness, severity, controllability and cause) on coping behaviors. The theoretical basis was Leventhal's Self-regulation Model. The longitudinal design used questionnaires and a diary to assess affective dispositions and record daily symptoms, symptom interpretations and behavioral responses over a 3-week period. A sequential sample of 180 adults with a chronic rheumatic condition was recruited from two rheumatology clinics. Data analyses, consisting of descriptive statistics and polychotomous logistic regression are currently being conducted. Negative emotionality is hypothesized to be associated with threatening symptom interpretations, with passive coping and with persistent use of ineffective strategies. Positive emotionality is hypothesized to be associated with problem-focused strategy use and social support. Contraint is hypothesized to be associated with a narrow range of coping strategies.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:40Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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