2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/161699
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevalence of chronic disease in an inner city, minority older adult population
Abstract:
Prevalence of chronic disease in an inner city, minority older adult population
Conference Sponsor:Midwest Nursing Research Society
Conference Year:2001
Author:Burgener, Sandy, RNC, PhD
P.I. Institution Name:University of Illinois
Title:Associate Professor
Contact Address:College of Nursing, 408 South Goodwin, MC076, Room 320, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA
Contact Telephone:(217) 333-3083
Ecological theories of aging point to the increased health risks of older adults with limited health care resources. A random sample (N=342) of adults living in an inner-city, medically underserved neighborhood were assessed for a variety of health factors, including measurement of actual blood pressure (B/P) and blood sugar (B.S.). Mean age was 67.6, including 85% African Americans and 40% males. In the 57.4% of the sample diagnosed with hypertension, 86% were receiving medications, but still presented with a mean systolic B/P of 162, maximum of 260, indicating 56% of the sample were not treated to American Heart Association goals. A total of 21% of the sample presented with a diabetes diagnosis, with 93% being on medications, and 65% having frequent pain. Approximately 25% of those diagnosed with diabetes had a B.S. >200 (2 hours after last meal), with a mean B.S. of 301 and range of 225-436, indicating under treatment of diabetes. Collectively, the findings point to the continued vulnerability to chronic disease in this high-risk population and their continuing unmet health care needs.
Repository Posting Date:
26-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
17-Oct-2011
Sponsors:
Midwest Nursing Research Society

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevalence of chronic disease in an inner city, minority older adult populationen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/161699-
dc.description.abstract<table><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-title">Prevalence of chronic disease in an inner city, minority older adult population</td></tr><tr class="item-sponsor"><td class="label">Conference Sponsor:</td><td class="value">Midwest Nursing Research Society</td></tr><tr class="item-year"><td class="label">Conference Year:</td><td class="value">2001</td></tr><tr class="item-author"><td class="label">Author:</td><td class="value">Burgener, Sandy, RNC, PhD</td></tr><tr class="item-institute"><td class="label">P.I. Institution Name:</td><td class="value">University of Illinois</td></tr><tr class="item-author-title"><td class="label">Title:</td><td class="value">Associate Professor</td></tr><tr class="item-address"><td class="label">Contact Address:</td><td class="value">College of Nursing, 408 South Goodwin, MC076, Room 320, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA</td></tr><tr class="item-phone"><td class="label">Contact Telephone:</td><td class="value">(217) 333-3083</td></tr><tr class="item-email"><td class="label">Email:</td><td class="value">sburgenr@uiuc.edu</td></tr><tr><td colspan="2" class="item-abstract">Ecological theories of aging point to the increased health risks of older adults with limited health care resources. A random sample (N=342) of adults living in an inner-city, medically underserved neighborhood were assessed for a variety of health factors, including measurement of actual blood pressure (B/P) and blood sugar (B.S.). Mean age was 67.6, including 85% African Americans and 40% males. In the 57.4% of the sample diagnosed with hypertension, 86% were receiving medications, but still presented with a mean systolic B/P of 162, maximum of 260, indicating 56% of the sample were not treated to American Heart Association goals. A total of 21% of the sample presented with a diabetes diagnosis, with 93% being on medications, and 65% having frequent pain. Approximately 25% of those diagnosed with diabetes had a B.S. &gt;200 (2 hours after last meal), with a mean B.S. of 301 and range of 225-436, indicating under treatment of diabetes. Collectively, the findings point to the continued vulnerability to chronic disease in this high-risk population and their continuing unmet health care needs.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-26T23:25:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-17en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-26T23:25:46Z-
dc.description.sponsorshipMidwest Nursing Research Societyen_GB
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